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Jewish Law Annual. Volume X (review)

Jewish Law Annual. Volume X (review) Hebrew Studies 35 (1994) argues that the unusual bond between the Jewish people and the Diaspora stems from the unbalanced relation between a dominant God and the sanctified and feared Homeland in Jewish consciousness. Itzhaki's thesis rests on the biblical phrase 'ehyeh 'aler 'ehyeh (Exod 3:14)-by which Yehudah Kaminka (the father) refers to himself-and the fact that he (the father) relates to the mother as the "homeland." In this case the intertextual analysis reveals a common denominator through which the meaning and the message of the novel are enriched and a new and very interesting reading is offered. In the third part of the book, Itzhaki summarizes his findings and conclusions. Since his study does not result in a new coherent thesis, the reader is again offered a list of the different sources that influenced each genre. The book's main contribution is toward a richer and deeper understanding of the individual worle Yehoshua's writings, however, and his lectures on Mr. Mani call for an analysis of his work in the light of psychoanalytic theories. His collective work would be better understood if Itzhaki's valuable links and insights were supplemented by additional studies, which explore the impact of psychoanalytic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Jewish Law Annual. Volume X (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Oct 5, 1994

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
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Abstract

Hebrew Studies 35 (1994) argues that the unusual bond between the Jewish people and the Diaspora stems from the unbalanced relation between a dominant God and the sanctified and feared Homeland in Jewish consciousness. Itzhaki's thesis rests on the biblical phrase 'ehyeh 'aler 'ehyeh (Exod 3:14)-by which Yehudah Kaminka (the father) refers to himself-and the fact that he (the father) relates to the mother as the "homeland." In this case the intertextual analysis reveals a common denominator through which the meaning and the message of the novel are enriched and a new and very interesting reading is offered. In the third part of the book, Itzhaki summarizes his findings and conclusions. Since his study does not result in a new coherent thesis, the reader is again offered a list of the different sources that influenced each genre. The book's main contribution is toward a richer and deeper understanding of the individual worle Yehoshua's writings, however, and his lectures on Mr. Mani call for an analysis of his work in the light of psychoanalytic theories. His collective work would be better understood if Itzhaki's valuable links and insights were supplemented by additional studies, which explore the impact of psychoanalytic

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1994

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