Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Israeli Holocaust Drama (review)

Israeli Holocaust Drama (review) lament a catastrophe that is boundless." For Appelfeld, by contrast, Mintz notes, "the Holocaust was the founding event of the self'; thus, Appelfeld's writing expresses a strong sense of rupture with the Jewish past, and with the Hebrew literary tradition. More than a decade after its initial publication, Hurban is startlingly fresh, insightful, and original. Throughout, Mintz looks at differences between literature written at or near the time of catastrophe and literature written at a greater distance from the event. His work suggests that our sense of how-and whether-Hebrew literature will absorb the Nazi genocide into the continuity of Jewish tradition and give it a meaning that provides for consolation and continuity remains incomplete, close as we are to the event. Sara R. Horowitz University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716 srh@udel.edu ISRAELI HOLOCAUST DRAMA. Michael Taub, ed. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1996. Paper, $19.95. pp. ix + 332. Jewish literature on the Shoah recounts the horrors of the Nazi treatment of Europe's Jews in the historical context of deep-rooted prejudices and ethnocentric behavior. A number of these works indict antisemitism, anti-Judaism, hypocritical humanitarianism, and the inactivity of influential leaders as contributing factors in the murder of innocents, including http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Israeli Holocaust Drama (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 39 (1) – Oct 5, 1998

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/israeli-holocaust-drama-review-IzxxwlsSto
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

lament a catastrophe that is boundless." For Appelfeld, by contrast, Mintz notes, "the Holocaust was the founding event of the self'; thus, Appelfeld's writing expresses a strong sense of rupture with the Jewish past, and with the Hebrew literary tradition. More than a decade after its initial publication, Hurban is startlingly fresh, insightful, and original. Throughout, Mintz looks at differences between literature written at or near the time of catastrophe and literature written at a greater distance from the event. His work suggests that our sense of how-and whether-Hebrew literature will absorb the Nazi genocide into the continuity of Jewish tradition and give it a meaning that provides for consolation and continuity remains incomplete, close as we are to the event. Sara R. Horowitz University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716 srh@udel.edu ISRAELI HOLOCAUST DRAMA. Michael Taub, ed. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1996. Paper, $19.95. pp. ix + 332. Jewish literature on the Shoah recounts the horrors of the Nazi treatment of Europe's Jews in the historical context of deep-rooted prejudices and ethnocentric behavior. A number of these works indict antisemitism, anti-Judaism, hypocritical humanitarianism, and the inactivity of influential leaders as contributing factors in the murder of innocents, including

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1998

There are no references for this article.