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Isaiah 40–66: Translation and Commentary by Shalom M. Paul (review)

Isaiah 40–66: Translation and Commentary by Shalom M. Paul (review) difference between claiming that `m hkhnym in this text is not a gloss of kmrym, whilst being told that the attempt to equate these two "may constitute a midrash of sorts on the deuteronomistic account of Josiah's Judean reform" (p. 97). Notwithstanding the few aforementioned points, I think that Monroe's book is a splendid piece of sound scholarship and that not only does it deal with the topic it sets out to investigate, but that it does this so well that along the way her work also turns out to be a manual on how one ought to conduct biblical studies in a proper and methodologically sound manner. I cannot help mentioning Monroe's brilliant text-critical observations, such as those found on page 101. This book is to be highly recommended to scholars and to postgraduate students dealing with the Hebrew Bible and with the history of ancient Israel. A fine gem indeed! Anthony J. Frendo University of Malta Msida, Malta anthony.frendo@um.edu.mt ISAIAH 40­66: TRANSLATION AND COMMENTARY. By Shalom M. Paul. Eerdmans Critical Commentary. Pp. xiii + 714. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012. Paper, $68.00. This commentary is the latest entry in the Eerdmans Critical Commentary series, a series that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Isaiah 40–66: Translation and Commentary by Shalom M. Paul (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 55 (1) – Dec 12, 2014

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
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2158-1681
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Abstract

difference between claiming that `m hkhnym in this text is not a gloss of kmrym, whilst being told that the attempt to equate these two "may constitute a midrash of sorts on the deuteronomistic account of Josiah's Judean reform" (p. 97). Notwithstanding the few aforementioned points, I think that Monroe's book is a splendid piece of sound scholarship and that not only does it deal with the topic it sets out to investigate, but that it does this so well that along the way her work also turns out to be a manual on how one ought to conduct biblical studies in a proper and methodologically sound manner. I cannot help mentioning Monroe's brilliant text-critical observations, such as those found on page 101. This book is to be highly recommended to scholars and to postgraduate students dealing with the Hebrew Bible and with the history of ancient Israel. A fine gem indeed! Anthony J. Frendo University of Malta Msida, Malta anthony.frendo@um.edu.mt ISAIAH 40­66: TRANSLATION AND COMMENTARY. By Shalom M. Paul. Eerdmans Critical Commentary. Pp. xiii + 714. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012. Paper, $68.00. This commentary is the latest entry in the Eerdmans Critical Commentary series, a series that

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Dec 12, 2014

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