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Intertextuality and the Reading of Midrash (review)

Intertextuality and the Reading of Midrash (review) Yaakov Elman Hebrew Studies, Volume 38, 1997, pp. 191-193 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.1997.0004 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/437062/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:38 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 38 (1997) 191 Reviews the accentuation. Kogut's work should be of interest to all students of the biblical text and the history of its interpretation. An English translation would no doubt be widely welcomed. E. J. Revell University of Toronto Toronto. Ontario. Canada INTERTEXTUALITY AND THE READING OF MIDRASH. By Daniel Boyarin. Pp. xii + 161. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1994. Paper, $9.95. Classic rabbinic midrash presupposes a view of Scripture in which ev­ ery scriptural element is of moral, legal, or theological significance. Understanding this essential stance of midrash helps define its purpose and delimit the range of interpretation it permits, but it does not at all illumi­ nate the methods that the fashioners of midrashic discourse employed in order to provide such interpretations. Indeed, certain midrashic interpreta­ tions seem to collapse the intuitive distinction between the pesha!, the "plain sense" of Scripture, and its midrashic interpretation. That being the case, it should be clear that midrash http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Intertextuality and the Reading of Midrash (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 38 – Oct 5, 2011

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

Yaakov Elman Hebrew Studies, Volume 38, 1997, pp. 191-193 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.1997.0004 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/437062/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:38 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 38 (1997) 191 Reviews the accentuation. Kogut's work should be of interest to all students of the biblical text and the history of its interpretation. An English translation would no doubt be widely welcomed. E. J. Revell University of Toronto Toronto. Ontario. Canada INTERTEXTUALITY AND THE READING OF MIDRASH. By Daniel Boyarin. Pp. xii + 161. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1994. Paper, $9.95. Classic rabbinic midrash presupposes a view of Scripture in which ev­ ery scriptural element is of moral, legal, or theological significance. Understanding this essential stance of midrash helps define its purpose and delimit the range of interpretation it permits, but it does not at all illumi­ nate the methods that the fashioners of midrashic discourse employed in order to provide such interpretations. Indeed, certain midrashic interpreta­ tions seem to collapse the intuitive distinction between the pesha!, the "plain sense" of Scripture, and its midrashic interpretation. That being the case, it should be clear that midrash

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2011

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