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Interpreting Hebrew Poetry (review)

Interpreting Hebrew Poetry (review) INTERPRETING HEBREW POETRY. By David L. Petersen and Kent Harold Richards. Guides to Biblical Scholarship. Gene Tucker, ed. pp. x + 112. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992. Paper, $6.95. In their contribution to the "Guides" series from Fortress Press, Petersen and Richards intend to provide a brief introduction to the unique features of Hebrew poetry. Since one-third of the Hebrew Bible is in poetic form, the necessity of some familiarity with this topic requires no explanation. The first chapter, "Understanding Hebrew Poetry," argues that there no longer exists a consensus with regard to parallelism and meter constituting the "essential characteristics" of the poetry. Thus the authors' propose to lay the groundwork for a new consensus, "one based on recent linguistic and literary study of Hebrew poetry and on theories on poetry in all languages" (p. 2). The chapter addresses the definition of Hebrew poetry. It outlines some of the problems related to the study of it, especially those problems particular to it because of our temporal and cultural distance from the time of the Bible. However, they claim that the principle problem consists in "the isolation of the study of this ancient poetry from the study of non-Semitic poetry," http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Interpreting Hebrew Poetry (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Oct 5, 1994

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
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Abstract

INTERPRETING HEBREW POETRY. By David L. Petersen and Kent Harold Richards. Guides to Biblical Scholarship. Gene Tucker, ed. pp. x + 112. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1992. Paper, $6.95. In their contribution to the "Guides" series from Fortress Press, Petersen and Richards intend to provide a brief introduction to the unique features of Hebrew poetry. Since one-third of the Hebrew Bible is in poetic form, the necessity of some familiarity with this topic requires no explanation. The first chapter, "Understanding Hebrew Poetry," argues that there no longer exists a consensus with regard to parallelism and meter constituting the "essential characteristics" of the poetry. Thus the authors' propose to lay the groundwork for a new consensus, "one based on recent linguistic and literary study of Hebrew poetry and on theories on poetry in all languages" (p. 2). The chapter addresses the definition of Hebrew poetry. It outlines some of the problems related to the study of it, especially those problems particular to it because of our temporal and cultural distance from the time of the Bible. However, they claim that the principle problem consists in "the isolation of the study of this ancient poetry from the study of non-Semitic poetry,"

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1994

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