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H. N. Bialik and the Quest for Ethical Identity

H. N. Bialik and the Quest for Ethical Identity Dan Miron Columbia University It is a common assumption that art in general and poetry in particular deepen and strengthen the collective identity of the community that they address. This presumably is one of the services--often the main one-they render the community. Poetry does this, we believe, by reactivizing the community's linguistic resources; by infusing its cultural traditions with the vitality of actual experience; by projecting the community's fears and hopes in vivid images and living symbols; by re-inventing its myths or collective ethical narratives. If this holds true for poetry in general, it is so much more so for poetry which addresses itself to a community whose sense of collective identity has been diminished or badly damaged. Communities which, due to ethnic, religious, social, cultural, or gen-der-detennined factors have been politically and culturally marginalized, often exhibit fractured identities. Here, as Deleuze and Guattari argued in their KafkaTowards a Minor Literature and David Lloyd in his Nationalism and Minor Literature, writers face a choice: embracing and deepening the group's sense of cultural and linguistic marginality, thus achieving both expressive intensity and a politico-cultural independence vis a vis the major, "colonizing," culture, or internalizing the nonns of the major http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

H. N. Bialik and the Quest for Ethical Identity

Hebrew Studies , Volume 41 (1) – Oct 5, 2000

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
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Abstract

Dan Miron Columbia University It is a common assumption that art in general and poetry in particular deepen and strengthen the collective identity of the community that they address. This presumably is one of the services--often the main one-they render the community. Poetry does this, we believe, by reactivizing the community's linguistic resources; by infusing its cultural traditions with the vitality of actual experience; by projecting the community's fears and hopes in vivid images and living symbols; by re-inventing its myths or collective ethical narratives. If this holds true for poetry in general, it is so much more so for poetry which addresses itself to a community whose sense of collective identity has been diminished or badly damaged. Communities which, due to ethnic, religious, social, cultural, or gen-der-detennined factors have been politically and culturally marginalized, often exhibit fractured identities. Here, as Deleuze and Guattari argued in their KafkaTowards a Minor Literature and David Lloyd in his Nationalism and Minor Literature, writers face a choice: embracing and deepening the group's sense of cultural and linguistic marginality, thus achieving both expressive intensity and a politico-cultural independence vis a vis the major, "colonizing," culture, or internalizing the nonns of the major

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2000

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