Gender Issues in Ancient and Reformation Translations of Genesis 1-4 (review)

Gender Issues in Ancient and Reformation Translations of Genesis 1-4 (review) practices that gave rise to them have significant consequences. The longstanding (although disintegrating) dichotomy between oral and written tradition collapses. Also, the practice of reading extraordinary significance into every minor variation in the textual traditions appears mistaken. Scholars usually look at certain variants assuming that they are deliberate and conscious written modifications, but Carr cites many examples that do not suggest a conscious process but rather memory error. This work is a highly significant contribution to the field that may impact how we think about textual transmission and therefore almost everything else. Carr fruitfully involves textual criticism and documented cases of textual transmission to support his arguments. Consequently, his book reads very differently from past attempts to chart the development of the Hebrew Bible. His empirical support and methodological modesty are refreshing. David A. Bosworth The Catholic University of America Washington, DC 20064 bosworth@cua.edu GENDER ISSUES IN ANCIENT AND REFORMATION TRANSLATIONS OF GENESIS 1­4. By Helen Kraus. Oxford Theological Monographs. Pp. xiii + 242. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Cloth, $125.00. In this diachronic study, Kraus traces the history of translations of Genesis 1­4 by choosing five authoritative translations from the Hellenistic period to the Reformation. Selected are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Gender Issues in Ancient and Reformation Translations of Genesis 1-4 (review)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/gender-issues-in-ancient-and-reformation-translations-of-genesis-1-4-8x70AVZDbG
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

practices that gave rise to them have significant consequences. The longstanding (although disintegrating) dichotomy between oral and written tradition collapses. Also, the practice of reading extraordinary significance into every minor variation in the textual traditions appears mistaken. Scholars usually look at certain variants assuming that they are deliberate and conscious written modifications, but Carr cites many examples that do not suggest a conscious process but rather memory error. This work is a highly significant contribution to the field that may impact how we think about textual transmission and therefore almost everything else. Carr fruitfully involves textual criticism and documented cases of textual transmission to support his arguments. Consequently, his book reads very differently from past attempts to chart the development of the Hebrew Bible. His empirical support and methodological modesty are refreshing. David A. Bosworth The Catholic University of America Washington, DC 20064 bosworth@cua.edu GENDER ISSUES IN ANCIENT AND REFORMATION TRANSLATIONS OF GENESIS 1­4. By Helen Kraus. Oxford Theological Monographs. Pp. xiii + 242. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Cloth, $125.00. In this diachronic study, Kraus traces the history of translations of Genesis 1­4 by choosing five authoritative translations from the Hellenistic period to the Reformation. Selected are

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Dec 12, 2012

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off