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Flame of Yahweh: Sexuality in the Old Testament (review)

Flame of Yahweh: Sexuality in the Old Testament (review) Jennifer L. Koosed Hebrew Studies, Volume 49, 2008, pp. 333-336 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.2008.0010 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/439558/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:34 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 49 (2008) 333 Reviews used to develop the historical narrative is drawn. Although the author is aware of legitimate disagreements among scholars that bear on these mat- ters, they do not penetrate the body of his work. Where he has staked out positions on topics in his earlier scholarship (mainly in French), he cites his own work and does not reargue his positions; in other cases, he indicates clearly with whom he agrees and provides additional references in the endnotes for someone interesting in pursuing a topic, as in the case of as- signing an important role to Moses in which he follows Roland de Vaux’s conclusions based on the latter’s 1971 book. The advantage of this type of presentation is that it results in a clear text that takes readers from A to B efficiently. The one big disadvantage with it, however, is that readers are never informed that the information about Hezekiah, for example, is taken http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Flame of Yahweh: Sexuality in the Old Testament (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 49 – Oct 5, 2011

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

Jennifer L. Koosed Hebrew Studies, Volume 49, 2008, pp. 333-336 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.2008.0010 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/439558/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:34 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 49 (2008) 333 Reviews used to develop the historical narrative is drawn. Although the author is aware of legitimate disagreements among scholars that bear on these mat- ters, they do not penetrate the body of his work. Where he has staked out positions on topics in his earlier scholarship (mainly in French), he cites his own work and does not reargue his positions; in other cases, he indicates clearly with whom he agrees and provides additional references in the endnotes for someone interesting in pursuing a topic, as in the case of as- signing an important role to Moses in which he follows Roland de Vaux’s conclusions based on the latter’s 1971 book. The advantage of this type of presentation is that it results in a clear text that takes readers from A to B efficiently. The one big disadvantage with it, however, is that readers are never informed that the information about Hezekiah, for example, is taken

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2011

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