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Exile and Restoration Revisited: Essays on the Babylonian and Persian Periods in Memory of Peter R. Ackroyd Edited by Gary N. Knoppers, Lester L. Grabbe, and Deirdre Fulton (review)

Exile and Restoration Revisited: Essays on the Babylonian and Persian Periods in Memory of Peter... Hebrew Studies 54 (2013) 425 Reviews lineates a metaphorical model of the divine royal garden that subsists in flux between the blessings of Edenic prosperity and the curses of Sodomic deso- lation (p. 178). His arguments are bolstered by several common lexical, syn- tactic, and semantic features that he identifies within and between the texts under scrutiny. This raises the compelling question (not addressed directly by the author; but cf. p. 29 n. 11) whether such commonalities emerged intentionally or reflexively from within Jeremiah’s cognitive–cultural com- plex. Do these poetic prophecies consciously tap into and expand a manufac- tured network of metaphorical thoughts? Or do they instead gravitate naturally toward cognitive fixed-point attractors within human thinking? This monograph is very studiously presented, with just a handful of typo- graphical and grammatical errors. The bibliography is exceptionally deep, and the extensive footnotes are chock-full of complementary (and occasion- ally just plain interesting) information pertaining to the vast interdisciplinary terrain of metaphor studies. The author presents numerous plausible argu- ments and persuasive examples that deserve sustained consideration by bib- lical scholars, cognitive linguists, and literary theorists (n.b. his intriguing view of Jeremiah 11–20’s so-called “confession” passages, pp. 205–227). By adeptly demonstrating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Exile and Restoration Revisited: Essays on the Babylonian and Persian Periods in Memory of Peter R. Ackroyd Edited by Gary N. Knoppers, Lester L. Grabbe, and Deirdre Fulton (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 54 – Dec 7, 2013

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

Hebrew Studies 54 (2013) 425 Reviews lineates a metaphorical model of the divine royal garden that subsists in flux between the blessings of Edenic prosperity and the curses of Sodomic deso- lation (p. 178). His arguments are bolstered by several common lexical, syn- tactic, and semantic features that he identifies within and between the texts under scrutiny. This raises the compelling question (not addressed directly by the author; but cf. p. 29 n. 11) whether such commonalities emerged intentionally or reflexively from within Jeremiah’s cognitive–cultural com- plex. Do these poetic prophecies consciously tap into and expand a manufac- tured network of metaphorical thoughts? Or do they instead gravitate naturally toward cognitive fixed-point attractors within human thinking? This monograph is very studiously presented, with just a handful of typo- graphical and grammatical errors. The bibliography is exceptionally deep, and the extensive footnotes are chock-full of complementary (and occasion- ally just plain interesting) information pertaining to the vast interdisciplinary terrain of metaphor studies. The author presents numerous plausible argu- ments and persuasive examples that deserve sustained consideration by bib- lical scholars, cognitive linguists, and literary theorists (n.b. his intriguing view of Jeremiah 11–20’s so-called “confession” passages, pp. 205–227). By adeptly demonstrating

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Dec 7, 2013

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