Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Esther: A Commentary (review)

Esther: A Commentary (review) Ruth. When Ruth's journey is understood not merely as a combination of "female" and "male" journey stories but as a critique of stifling concepts of female or male, then the story of Ruth may elucidate our own journeys. Susanne Scholz The College o/Wooster Wooster,OH 44691 watermate4@aol.com ESTHER: A COMMENTARY. By Jon D. Levenson. Old Testament Library. pp. 136. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1997. Cloth, $22.00. Levenson has provided us with a careful and perceptive analysis of the book of Esther read through the lenses of narrative theology. The different scenes are discussed and incorporated into the flow of the main plot and sub-plots, clarifying for us the diversity of themes and the beauty of this excellent literary composition. Levenson writes with clarity and precision and retains the interest of the reader by keeping the story in mind while dealing with technical elements such as word discussions, redactional matters and different opinions on the meaning of the text. According to Levenson, the book was probably written during the Second Temple period, sometime during the fourth or third century BeE. In agreement with other scholars, he argues that Esther belongs to the literary genre called historical novella. This means that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Esther: A Commentary (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 39 (1) – Oct 5, 1998

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/esther-a-commentary-review-htRLgkNra1
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ruth. When Ruth's journey is understood not merely as a combination of "female" and "male" journey stories but as a critique of stifling concepts of female or male, then the story of Ruth may elucidate our own journeys. Susanne Scholz The College o/Wooster Wooster,OH 44691 watermate4@aol.com ESTHER: A COMMENTARY. By Jon D. Levenson. Old Testament Library. pp. 136. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1997. Cloth, $22.00. Levenson has provided us with a careful and perceptive analysis of the book of Esther read through the lenses of narrative theology. The different scenes are discussed and incorporated into the flow of the main plot and sub-plots, clarifying for us the diversity of themes and the beauty of this excellent literary composition. Levenson writes with clarity and precision and retains the interest of the reader by keeping the story in mind while dealing with technical elements such as word discussions, redactional matters and different opinions on the meaning of the text. According to Levenson, the book was probably written during the Second Temple period, sometime during the fourth or third century BeE. In agreement with other scholars, he argues that Esther belongs to the literary genre called historical novella. This means that

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1998

There are no references for this article.