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Drama and Ideology in Modern Israel (review)

Drama and Ideology in Modern Israel (review) wrote imaginative prose in Yiddish and Hebrew. But to say that he ultimately "chose" Yiddish and she "chose" Hebrew, and that countless others followed suit is to revive a kind of intentional fallacy. Seidman stops well short of such reductions, but her invocation of the choice issue should remind us of the ongoing need to challenge its basic assumptions. The rhetoric of choice seems inappropriate to the dynamics of Yiddish-Hebrew language use and significance. The Jewish language wars are no longer fought on the streets or at home. They do not enliven political or social debates as they once did. But Seidman's book demonstrates how lively they may still be even today, even in English. Given their connection to what she and others have called a sexual dynamic, a familiar struggle between eros and logos, we can only hope that the war is not finally won by anyone. Anita Norich University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 norich@umich.edu DRAMA AND IDEOLOGY IN MODERN ISRAEL. By Glenda Abramson. pp. x + 265. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Cloth, $64.95. This excellent, perceptive study is a treat for both the scholar and the general reader of Israeli literature. It is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Drama and Ideology in Modern Israel (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 41 (1) – Oct 5, 2000

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
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Abstract

wrote imaginative prose in Yiddish and Hebrew. But to say that he ultimately "chose" Yiddish and she "chose" Hebrew, and that countless others followed suit is to revive a kind of intentional fallacy. Seidman stops well short of such reductions, but her invocation of the choice issue should remind us of the ongoing need to challenge its basic assumptions. The rhetoric of choice seems inappropriate to the dynamics of Yiddish-Hebrew language use and significance. The Jewish language wars are no longer fought on the streets or at home. They do not enliven political or social debates as they once did. But Seidman's book demonstrates how lively they may still be even today, even in English. Given their connection to what she and others have called a sexual dynamic, a familiar struggle between eros and logos, we can only hope that the war is not finally won by anyone. Anita Norich University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 norich@umich.edu DRAMA AND IDEOLOGY IN MODERN ISRAEL. By Glenda Abramson. pp. x + 265. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Cloth, $64.95. This excellent, perceptive study is a treat for both the scholar and the general reader of Israeli literature. It is

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2000

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