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Discourses of Mourning and Rebirth in Post-Holocaust Israeli Literature: Leah Goldberg's Lady of the Castle and Shulamith Hareven's "The Witness"

Discourses of Mourning and Rebirth in Post-Holocaust Israeli Literature: Leah Goldberg's Lady of... DISCOURSES OF MOURNING AND REBIRTH IN POSTHOLOCAUST ISRAELI LITERATURE: LEAH GOLDBERG'S LADY OF THE CASTLE AND SHULAMITH HAREVEN'S "THE WITNESS" Rachel Peldhay Brenner York University, Toronto The events of the Holocaust effected a complicated discourse in Israeli literature. This literature, which had long been preoccupied with the themes of Israeli nation building, was suddenly compelled to search for proper modes of response to the Diaspora destruction. The difficulty of approaching the unspeakable was compounded from the outset by the Yishuv's powerfully promoted notion of "a new beginning" which posited "an ideological divide" between the Diaspora Jews and the Israeli born sabras (Yudkin 1984: 1-2). In many of their programmatic statements, leading politicians and writers of the Yishuv manifested a tendency to subsume the catastrophe into the triumphant process of Jewish rebirth. Avraham Shlonsky, for instance, "claimed that the most significant act of defiance that the inhabitants of the Yishuv could engage in would be to carry on business as usual and to show that in at least one comer of the world Jews were thriving" (Ezrahi 1985-1986:252). Later, this attitude was further reinforced: public commemorations of the Holocaust have been designed to emphasize the regenerative force of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Discourses of Mourning and Rebirth in Post-Holocaust Israeli Literature: Leah Goldberg's Lady of the Castle and Shulamith Hareven's "The Witness"

Hebrew Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Oct 5, 1990

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
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Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
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Abstract

DISCOURSES OF MOURNING AND REBIRTH IN POSTHOLOCAUST ISRAELI LITERATURE: LEAH GOLDBERG'S LADY OF THE CASTLE AND SHULAMITH HAREVEN'S "THE WITNESS" Rachel Peldhay Brenner York University, Toronto The events of the Holocaust effected a complicated discourse in Israeli literature. This literature, which had long been preoccupied with the themes of Israeli nation building, was suddenly compelled to search for proper modes of response to the Diaspora destruction. The difficulty of approaching the unspeakable was compounded from the outset by the Yishuv's powerfully promoted notion of "a new beginning" which posited "an ideological divide" between the Diaspora Jews and the Israeli born sabras (Yudkin 1984: 1-2). In many of their programmatic statements, leading politicians and writers of the Yishuv manifested a tendency to subsume the catastrophe into the triumphant process of Jewish rebirth. Avraham Shlonsky, for instance, "claimed that the most significant act of defiance that the inhabitants of the Yishuv could engage in would be to carry on business as usual and to show that in at least one comer of the world Jews were thriving" (Ezrahi 1985-1986:252). Later, this attitude was further reinforced: public commemorations of the Holocaust have been designed to emphasize the regenerative force of the

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1990

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