Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Beyond the Legend: A Study of Abba Kovner's Poetry (review)

Beyond the Legend: A Study of Abba Kovner's Poetry (review) be labeled as decadent/optimistic/pessimistic/nihilistic/sexually licentious/ non-licentious/ and which are inflected by Nietzsche or Schopenhauer. She adds a similarly shaded inventory of criticism of decadence (p. 242). One is reminded of an old Mort Sahl routine in which the night club comic labeled all political figures along a multi-shaded spectrum from left to right. At the same time we must praise the achievements of this book, and they are as noted, a consequence of this detail. Bar Yosef is able to bring her detail to bear on one of literature's serious macro-issues: when the very qualities which inspire one label in an early age, actually foster a contrary label with the perspective of time. (See p. 243, for one example of this.) Finally, it is Bar Yosefs attention to history and to the history of criticism which points towards the enhancement of decadent themes precisely in the place, Eretz Israel, which was created to abolish an exilic decadence. (See chapter 5, especially.) As Bar Yosef notes so importantly in her afterward: The influence of Decadence has been absorbed into the very foundation of Modern Hebrew Literature. in spite of the spiritual and ideological opposition of most of the literary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Beyond the Legend: A Study of Abba Kovner's Poetry (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 41 (1) – Oct 5, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/beyond-the-legend-a-study-of-abba-kovner-s-poetry-review-vygap1AfdF
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

be labeled as decadent/optimistic/pessimistic/nihilistic/sexually licentious/ non-licentious/ and which are inflected by Nietzsche or Schopenhauer. She adds a similarly shaded inventory of criticism of decadence (p. 242). One is reminded of an old Mort Sahl routine in which the night club comic labeled all political figures along a multi-shaded spectrum from left to right. At the same time we must praise the achievements of this book, and they are as noted, a consequence of this detail. Bar Yosef is able to bring her detail to bear on one of literature's serious macro-issues: when the very qualities which inspire one label in an early age, actually foster a contrary label with the perspective of time. (See p. 243, for one example of this.) Finally, it is Bar Yosefs attention to history and to the history of criticism which points towards the enhancement of decadent themes precisely in the place, Eretz Israel, which was created to abolish an exilic decadence. (See chapter 5, especially.) As Bar Yosef notes so importantly in her afterward: The influence of Decadence has been absorbed into the very foundation of Modern Hebrew Literature. in spite of the spiritual and ideological opposition of most of the literary

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2000

There are no references for this article.