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A Kingdom of Priests: Ancestry and Merit in Ancient Judaism (review)

A Kingdom of Priests: Ancestry and Merit in Ancient Judaism (review) A Kingdom of Priests: Ancestry and Merit in Ancient Judaism (review) Daniel R. Schwartz Hebrew Studies, Volume 49, 2008, pp. 346-349 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.2008.0039 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/439562/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:34 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 49 (2008) 346 Reviews ending with Jehoiakin’s release was added to indicate acceptance of a Diaspora reality. The Deuteronomistic History would ultimatly undergo some further editing, but Römer does not see this editing as any longer “Deuteronomistic,” but calculated to create the current canonical separation between Torah and Former Prophets. This late phase involved the addition of 2 Samuel 21–24 and the Elijah-Elisha cycle. Römer manifests a strange combination of skepticism and confidence about our ability to discern the composition of the Deuteronomistic History. Unlike more detailed works, he does not try to separate a single verse into a half-dozen different sources and redactional layers because ancient Near Eastern evidence suggests that ancient scribal practices were not as me- chanical as source critics have sometimes imagined. Rather, the scribes adopted a free attitude to earlier texts. Therefore, “we cannot reconstruct exactly the older texts that have been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

A Kingdom of Priests: Ancestry and Merit in Ancient Judaism (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 49 – Oct 5, 2011

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

A Kingdom of Priests: Ancestry and Merit in Ancient Judaism (review) Daniel R. Schwartz Hebrew Studies, Volume 49, 2008, pp. 346-349 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.2008.0039 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/439562/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:34 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 49 (2008) 346 Reviews ending with Jehoiakin’s release was added to indicate acceptance of a Diaspora reality. The Deuteronomistic History would ultimatly undergo some further editing, but Römer does not see this editing as any longer “Deuteronomistic,” but calculated to create the current canonical separation between Torah and Former Prophets. This late phase involved the addition of 2 Samuel 21–24 and the Elijah-Elisha cycle. Römer manifests a strange combination of skepticism and confidence about our ability to discern the composition of the Deuteronomistic History. Unlike more detailed works, he does not try to separate a single verse into a half-dozen different sources and redactional layers because ancient Near Eastern evidence suggests that ancient scribal practices were not as me- chanical as source critics have sometimes imagined. Rather, the scribes adopted a free attitude to earlier texts. Therefore, “we cannot reconstruct exactly the older texts that have been

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2011

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