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1, 2 Kings (review)

1, 2 Kings (review) David Penchansky Hebrew Studies, Volume 38, 1997, pp. 131-134 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.1997.0024 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/437039/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:38 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 38 (1997) 131 Reviews Lindars' analysis of the first five chapters of Judges represents the work of a highly skilled scholar. It demonstrates a solid mastery of the historical­ critical and literary issues involved in analyzing these materials. Its major strength, however, lies in its text-critical emphases. Lindars believed that scholarship could benefit from an eclectic Greek text of Judges that would constitute the best possible approximation of the original Old Greek, which might date as early as the third century B.C.E. The major witnesses to the Old Greek are to be found in certain minuscules which are relatively free I, n, and w, which are designated from Hexaplaric influence (especially g, All). It is regrettable that Lindars' efforts at reconstructing this text were not completed. Because the commentary is only partially completed, it lacks a compre­ hensive introduction, which would have eliminated many of the weaknesses noted. As it stands, and understandably so, it is very difficult to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

1, 2 Kings (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 38 – Oct 5, 2011

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

David Penchansky Hebrew Studies, Volume 38, 1997, pp. 131-134 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.1997.0024 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/437039/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:38 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 38 (1997) 131 Reviews Lindars' analysis of the first five chapters of Judges represents the work of a highly skilled scholar. It demonstrates a solid mastery of the historical­ critical and literary issues involved in analyzing these materials. Its major strength, however, lies in its text-critical emphases. Lindars believed that scholarship could benefit from an eclectic Greek text of Judges that would constitute the best possible approximation of the original Old Greek, which might date as early as the third century B.C.E. The major witnesses to the Old Greek are to be found in certain minuscules which are relatively free I, n, and w, which are designated from Hexaplaric influence (especially g, All). It is regrettable that Lindars' efforts at reconstructing this text were not completed. Because the commentary is only partially completed, it lacks a compre­ hensive introduction, which would have eliminated many of the weaknesses noted. As it stands, and understandably so, it is very difficult to

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2011

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