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The Secret History of Science and Modernity: The History of Science and the History of Religion

The Secret History of Science and Modernity: The History of Science and the History of Religion Giant telescope on display at the Palais de l’Optique, Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1900. From Le panorama (1900). 14 https://doi.org/10.1162/grey_a_00347 The Secret History of Science and Modernity: The History of Science and the History of Religion LORRAINE DASTON I. The Bullet Train Before circa 1870, if you had posed the question, “What has modern science got to do with modernity?” the answer would probably have been “not much.” To some of the most perceptive mid-nineteenth-century observers of how society was under- going unprecedented economic, social, political, and techno- logical changes, science was a sideshow. One of the earliest descriptions of the experience of modernity comes from Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s Communist Manifesto, written in the febrile early months of the revolutionary year 1848: Constant revolutionising of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncer- tainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions, are swept away, all new-formed ones become antiquated before they can ossify. All that is solid, melts into air, all that is holy is profaned [Alles Ständische und Stehende verdampft, alles Heilige wird entweiht]. According to Marx and Engels, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Grey Room MIT Press

The Secret History of Science and Modernity: The History of Science and the History of Religion

Grey Room , Volume (88): 18 – Jul 1, 2022

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2022 Grey Room, Inc. and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
ISSN
1526-3819
eISSN
1536-0105
DOI
10.1162/grey_a_00347
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Giant telescope on display at the Palais de l’Optique, Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1900. From Le panorama (1900). 14 https://doi.org/10.1162/grey_a_00347 The Secret History of Science and Modernity: The History of Science and the History of Religion LORRAINE DASTON I. The Bullet Train Before circa 1870, if you had posed the question, “What has modern science got to do with modernity?” the answer would probably have been “not much.” To some of the most perceptive mid-nineteenth-century observers of how society was under- going unprecedented economic, social, political, and techno- logical changes, science was a sideshow. One of the earliest descriptions of the experience of modernity comes from Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s Communist Manifesto, written in the febrile early months of the revolutionary year 1848: Constant revolutionising of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncer- tainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions, are swept away, all new-formed ones become antiquated before they can ossify. All that is solid, melts into air, all that is holy is profaned [Alles Ständische und Stehende verdampft, alles Heilige wird entweiht]. According to Marx and Engels,

Journal

Grey RoomMIT Press

Published: Jul 1, 2022

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