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Kennedy, Macmillan and Nuclear Weapons

Kennedy, Macmillan and Nuclear Weapons Book Reviews Donette Murray, Kennedy, Macmillan and Nuclear Weapons. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2000. 220 pp. $65.00. Reviewed by John Baylis, University of Wales, Swansea The Skybolt crisis and its aftermath in many ways epitomized both the discord and the collaboration that have characterized the relationship between Great Britain and the United States since the Second World War. With the exception of Suez, Donette Murray argues in Kennedy, Macmillan and Nuclear Weapons, “Anglo-American relations were never so starkly and publicly in disarray” (p. 31) as during the period in late 1962 when Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara announced the cancellation of the experimental Skybolt air-launched ballistic missile, which had been slated to become the centerpiece of Britain’s independent nuclear deterrent. In turn, the Nassau agreement that followed the crisis proved to be a milestone in the subsequent development of the “special relationship” between the two countries. The story of the Skybolt crisis and its impact on Anglo-American relations has been told many times, but, as Murray indicates, one of the stimulating things about historical research is that new evidence constantly emerges and provides the basis for a fresh analysis of past events. In this account of the Skybolt crisis, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cold War Studies MIT Press

Kennedy, Macmillan and Nuclear Weapons

Journal of Cold War Studies , Volume 3 (1) – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2001 President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Subject
Book Reviews
ISSN
1520-3972
eISSN
1531-3298
DOI
10.1162/jcws.2001.3.1.126
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews Donette Murray, Kennedy, Macmillan and Nuclear Weapons. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2000. 220 pp. $65.00. Reviewed by John Baylis, University of Wales, Swansea The Skybolt crisis and its aftermath in many ways epitomized both the discord and the collaboration that have characterized the relationship between Great Britain and the United States since the Second World War. With the exception of Suez, Donette Murray argues in Kennedy, Macmillan and Nuclear Weapons, “Anglo-American relations were never so starkly and publicly in disarray” (p. 31) as during the period in late 1962 when Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara announced the cancellation of the experimental Skybolt air-launched ballistic missile, which had been slated to become the centerpiece of Britain’s independent nuclear deterrent. In turn, the Nassau agreement that followed the crisis proved to be a milestone in the subsequent development of the “special relationship” between the two countries. The story of the Skybolt crisis and its impact on Anglo-American relations has been told many times, but, as Murray indicates, one of the stimulating things about historical research is that new evidence constantly emerges and provides the basis for a fresh analysis of past events. In this account of the Skybolt crisis, the

Journal

Journal of Cold War StudiesMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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