Effects of Background Color on the Global and Local Processing of Hierarchically Organized Stimuli

Effects of Background Color on the Global and Local Processing of Hierarchically Organized Stimuli Recent studies have shown that (1) the global precedence effects in processing the hierarchically organized stimulus can be attenuated by eliminating the low spatial frequencies contained in the stimulus and (2) the human magnocellular pathway is responsible for processing low spatial frequencies and the pathway can be attenuated by imposing a red background on the stimulus. In the present study, a reaction-time experiment was conducted to examine the effect of background color of the stimulus to the processing of the hierarchically organized stimulus. The result showed that although the control condition (a green background) produced a prototypical asymmetric global interference, a red background that was equiluminant to the green background produced a symmetrical interference. It was concluded that the human magnocellular pathway is at least partially responsible in producing the global precedence effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience MIT Press

Effects of Background Color on the Global and Local Processing of Hierarchically Organized Stimuli

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 1999 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0898-929X
eISSN
1530-8898
D.O.I.
10.1162/089892999563201
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that (1) the global precedence effects in processing the hierarchically organized stimulus can be attenuated by eliminating the low spatial frequencies contained in the stimulus and (2) the human magnocellular pathway is responsible for processing low spatial frequencies and the pathway can be attenuated by imposing a red background on the stimulus. In the present study, a reaction-time experiment was conducted to examine the effect of background color of the stimulus to the processing of the hierarchically organized stimulus. The result showed that although the control condition (a green background) produced a prototypical asymmetric global interference, a red background that was equiluminant to the green background produced a symmetrical interference. It was concluded that the human magnocellular pathway is at least partially responsible in producing the global precedence effects.

Journal

Journal of Cognitive NeuroscienceMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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