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When Conventional Diabetes Care Is Viewed as Complementary: Perspectives of a Chinese Client

When Conventional Diabetes Care Is Viewed as Complementary: Perspectives of a Chinese Client Rx:RN When Conventional Diabetes Care Is Viewed as Complementary Perspectives of a Chinese Client Sepali Guruge, R.N., B.Sc.N., M.Sc., Ruth Lee, R.N., M.Sc.N., Ph.D., and Rebecca Hagey, Ph.D., R.N. dies which are applied on a ge nera lly empirical basis and often by non-licensed practitioners who may be specialists.”1 Most health practitioners who are interested in alternative medical systems are probably familiar with the Taoist principles of Yin and Yang, which advocate adherence to the way of nature to achieve harmony with the universe. Yin is the feminine quality and Yang is the masculine one . The human being, who is part of the universe and who is a microuniverse, is also governed by nature’s two opposing forces and owes his or her life and health to the harmony and balance of natural forces. Following the Tao—achieving harmony with Yin and Yang and avoiding extremes in emotions and in physical and social activities— one can attain good health and long life. 2 When Yin and Yang are unbalanced for prolonged periods of time or in an extreme manner, the deficiency of one force cannot continue to support the excess of the other force. A rebalancing, is called for. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Alternative and Complementary Therapies Mary Ann Liebert

When Conventional Diabetes Care Is Viewed as Complementary: Perspectives of a Chinese Client

When Conventional Diabetes Care Is Viewed as Complementary: Perspectives of a Chinese Client

Alternative and Complementary Therapies , Volume 7 (2) – Apr 1, 2001

Abstract

Rx:RN When Conventional Diabetes Care Is Viewed as Complementary Perspectives of a Chinese Client Sepali Guruge, R.N., B.Sc.N., M.Sc., Ruth Lee, R.N., M.Sc.N., Ph.D., and Rebecca Hagey, Ph.D., R.N. dies which are applied on a ge nera lly empirical basis and often by non-licensed practitioners who may be specialists.”1 Most health practitioners who are interested in alternative medical systems are probably familiar with the Taoist principles of Yin and Yang, which advocate adherence to the way of nature to achieve harmony with the universe. Yin is the feminine quality and Yang is the masculine one . The human being, who is part of the universe and who is a microuniverse, is also governed by nature’s two opposing forces and owes his or her life and health to the harmony and balance of natural forces. Following the Tao—achieving harmony with Yin and Yang and avoiding extremes in emotions and in physical and social activities— one can attain good health and long life. 2 When Yin and Yang are unbalanced for prolonged periods of time or in an extreme manner, the deficiency of one force cannot continue to support the excess of the other force. A rebalancing, is called for.

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 2001 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Subject
Rx:RN
ISSN
1076-2809
eISSN
1076-2809
DOI
10.1089/10762800151125191
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rx:RN When Conventional Diabetes Care Is Viewed as Complementary Perspectives of a Chinese Client Sepali Guruge, R.N., B.Sc.N., M.Sc., Ruth Lee, R.N., M.Sc.N., Ph.D., and Rebecca Hagey, Ph.D., R.N. dies which are applied on a ge nera lly empirical basis and often by non-licensed practitioners who may be specialists.”1 Most health practitioners who are interested in alternative medical systems are probably familiar with the Taoist principles of Yin and Yang, which advocate adherence to the way of nature to achieve harmony with the universe. Yin is the feminine quality and Yang is the masculine one . The human being, who is part of the universe and who is a microuniverse, is also governed by nature’s two opposing forces and owes his or her life and health to the harmony and balance of natural forces. Following the Tao—achieving harmony with Yin and Yang and avoiding extremes in emotions and in physical and social activities— one can attain good health and long life. 2 When Yin and Yang are unbalanced for prolonged periods of time or in an extreme manner, the deficiency of one force cannot continue to support the excess of the other force. A rebalancing, is called for.

Journal

Alternative and Complementary TherapiesMary Ann Liebert

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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