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Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detection of Candida albicans for Confirmation of Clinical Diagnosis of Nipple Thrush

Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detection of Candida albicans for Confirmation of Clinical Diagnosis... Letter to the Editor Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detection of Candida albicans for Confirmation of Clinical Diagnosis of Nipple Thrush Mariana Panjaitan,1 Lisa H. Amir,1,2 Anna-Maria Costa,3 Elice Rudland,3 and Sepehr Tabrizi3,4 Dear Editor: Breastfeeding women who develop persistent, burning nipple pain, often accompanied by radiating breast pain, may be diagnosed as having Candida infection or “nipple thrush.”1 The nipple and areola appear pink and/or shiny,2 while the breast appears normal (that is, not inflamed as in mastitis). Nipple thrush often follows a course of antibiotics in labor, birth, or postpartum.3 Most women with this characteristic pain respond to antifungal treatment for mother and infant.1 However, it has been difficult to confirm Candida infection with standard microbiological testing, and conflicting results have been published.4 Breastfeeding women with nipple pain have been found to be more likely to be positive for Candida albicans than breastfeeding women without pain in some studies,5,6 but not in others.7,8 Molecular detection techniques have not been used in studies of “nipple thrush,” so the aim of this study was to establish if polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of C. albicans in breastfeeding women presenting with clinical nipple http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Breastfeeding Medicine Mary Ann Liebert

Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detection of Candida albicans for Confirmation of Clinical Diagnosis of Nipple Thrush

Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detection of Candida albicans for Confirmation of Clinical Diagnosis of Nipple Thrush

Breastfeeding Medicine , Volume 3 (3) – Sep 1, 2008

Abstract

Letter to the Editor Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detection of Candida albicans for Confirmation of Clinical Diagnosis of Nipple Thrush Mariana Panjaitan,1 Lisa H. Amir,1,2 Anna-Maria Costa,3 Elice Rudland,3 and Sepehr Tabrizi3,4 Dear Editor: Breastfeeding women who develop persistent, burning nipple pain, often accompanied by radiating breast pain, may be diagnosed as having Candida infection or “nipple thrush.”1 The nipple and areola appear pink and/or shiny,2 while the breast appears normal (that is, not inflamed as in mastitis). Nipple thrush often follows a course of antibiotics in labor, birth, or postpartum.3 Most women with this characteristic pain respond to antifungal treatment for mother and infant.1 However, it has been difficult to confirm Candida infection with standard microbiological testing, and conflicting results have been published.4 Breastfeeding women with nipple pain have been found to be more likely to be positive for Candida albicans than breastfeeding women without pain in some studies,5,6 but not in others.7,8 Molecular detection techniques have not been used in studies of “nipple thrush,” so the aim of this study was to establish if polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of C. albicans in breastfeeding women presenting with clinical nipple

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
© 2008 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Subject
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
ISSN
1556-8253
eISSN
1556-8253
DOI
10.1089/bfm.2008.0106
pmid
18778216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letter to the Editor Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detection of Candida albicans for Confirmation of Clinical Diagnosis of Nipple Thrush Mariana Panjaitan,1 Lisa H. Amir,1,2 Anna-Maria Costa,3 Elice Rudland,3 and Sepehr Tabrizi3,4 Dear Editor: Breastfeeding women who develop persistent, burning nipple pain, often accompanied by radiating breast pain, may be diagnosed as having Candida infection or “nipple thrush.”1 The nipple and areola appear pink and/or shiny,2 while the breast appears normal (that is, not inflamed as in mastitis). Nipple thrush often follows a course of antibiotics in labor, birth, or postpartum.3 Most women with this characteristic pain respond to antifungal treatment for mother and infant.1 However, it has been difficult to confirm Candida infection with standard microbiological testing, and conflicting results have been published.4 Breastfeeding women with nipple pain have been found to be more likely to be positive for Candida albicans than breastfeeding women without pain in some studies,5,6 but not in others.7,8 Molecular detection techniques have not been used in studies of “nipple thrush,” so the aim of this study was to establish if polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of C. albicans in breastfeeding women presenting with clinical nipple

Journal

Breastfeeding MedicineMary Ann Liebert

Published: Sep 1, 2008

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