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The Little Flower and the New Evangelization

The Little Flower and the New Evangelization Roger Duncan Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture, Volume 3, Number 3, Summer 2000, pp. 109-123 (Article) Published by Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/log.2000.0027 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/425911/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 19:10 GMT from JHU Libraries Roger Duncan The Little Flower and the New Evangelization Thousands of people in different parts of the world have been view- ing and touching the relics of St. Thérèse of Lisieux, "the Little Flower," as the new millennium dawns. As she has on numerous occasions been recognized as the special saint for our time,1 it becomes very important to understand more clearly how that is so, lest we miss her special importance for the new evangelization. Since she has been proclaimed a Doctor of the Church we would do well to acquaint others and ourselves with what she taught by word and example. Some people, reading her autobiography, and confus- ing the late nineteenth-century gift wrap with the gift itself, have not liked her very much. "A sugary little saint," or something to that effect, said James Agee, contrasting her with Theresa of Avila. This kind of misunderstanding, by those http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture Logos: Journal of Catholic Thought & Culture

The Little Flower and the New Evangelization

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Publisher
Logos: Journal of Catholic Thought & Culture
Copyright
Copyright © The University of St. Thomas
ISSN
1533-791X

Abstract

Roger Duncan Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture, Volume 3, Number 3, Summer 2000, pp. 109-123 (Article) Published by Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/log.2000.0027 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/425911/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 19:10 GMT from JHU Libraries Roger Duncan The Little Flower and the New Evangelization Thousands of people in different parts of the world have been view- ing and touching the relics of St. Thérèse of Lisieux, "the Little Flower," as the new millennium dawns. As she has on numerous occasions been recognized as the special saint for our time,1 it becomes very important to understand more clearly how that is so, lest we miss her special importance for the new evangelization. Since she has been proclaimed a Doctor of the Church we would do well to acquaint others and ourselves with what she taught by word and example. Some people, reading her autobiography, and confus- ing the late nineteenth-century gift wrap with the gift itself, have not liked her very much. "A sugary little saint," or something to that effect, said James Agee, contrasting her with Theresa of Avila. This kind of misunderstanding, by those

Journal

Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and CultureLogos: Journal of Catholic Thought & Culture

Published: Apr 4, 2012

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