The time course of individuals’ perception of coarticulatory information is linked to their production: Implications for sound change

The time course of individuals’ perception of coarticulatory information is linked to their... <p>Abstract:</p><p>Understanding the relation between speech production and perception is foundational to phonetic theory, and is similarly central to theories of the phonetics of sound change. For sound changes that are arguably perceptually motivated, it is particularly important to establish that an individual listener’s selective attention—for example, to the redundant information afforded by coarticulation—is reflected in that individual’s own productions. This study reports the results of a pair of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that individuals who produce more consistent and extensive coarticulation will attend to that information especially closely in perception. The production experiment used nasal airflow to measure the time course of participants’ coarticulatory vowel nasalization; the perception experiment used an eye-tracking paradigm to measure the time course of those same participants’ attention to coarticulated nasality. Results showed that a speaker’s coarticulatory patterns predicted, to some degree, that individual’s perception, thereby supporting the hypothesis: participants who produced earlier onset of coarticulatory nasalization were, as listeners, more efficient users of nasality as that information unfolded over time. Thus, an individual’s perception of coarticulated speech is made public through their productions.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Language Linguistic Society of America

The time course of individuals’ perception of coarticulatory information is linked to their production: Implications for sound change

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Publisher
Linguistic Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © Linguistic Society of America.
ISSN
1535-0665

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Understanding the relation between speech production and perception is foundational to phonetic theory, and is similarly central to theories of the phonetics of sound change. For sound changes that are arguably perceptually motivated, it is particularly important to establish that an individual listener’s selective attention—for example, to the redundant information afforded by coarticulation—is reflected in that individual’s own productions. This study reports the results of a pair of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that individuals who produce more consistent and extensive coarticulation will attend to that information especially closely in perception. The production experiment used nasal airflow to measure the time course of participants’ coarticulatory vowel nasalization; the perception experiment used an eye-tracking paradigm to measure the time course of those same participants’ attention to coarticulated nasality. Results showed that a speaker’s coarticulatory patterns predicted, to some degree, that individual’s perception, thereby supporting the hypothesis: participants who produced earlier onset of coarticulatory nasalization were, as listeners, more efficient users of nasality as that information unfolded over time. Thus, an individual’s perception of coarticulated speech is made public through their productions.</p>

Journal

LanguageLinguistic Society of America

Published: Dec 19, 2018

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