Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The UK Broadcasting Act 1996: A Holding Operation?

The UK Broadcasting Act 1996: A Holding Operation? The UK Broadcasting Act 1996: A Holding Operation? Mike Feintuck* Introduction While the marketization of telecommunications services and infrastructure has proceeded apace over the last ten years in Britain, few legislative steps have been taken to address arguably the key communications issues of the present and the next century - the convergence of media technology. The latest Broadcasting Act does little to rectify this situation. Its focus is upon the development of digital terrestrial television and radio and revising the rules on concentration of media ownership. It fails to integrate broadcasting regulation into the broader, and ever more relevant, context of an increasingly international and integrated market in telecommunications, computer technology, printed media and television and radio broadcasting. As a consequence, it seems possible that British media regulators will remain in the position aptly described by Elliott in 1981 in terms of 'chasing the receding bus'.' This is not the place to expound upon the various rationales for regulating the media which have been adequately discussed e l ~ e w h e r e . ~ However, it is perhaps helpful to remember that they range from spectrum scarcity (hardly an issue in the digital age) and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Public Law Kluwer Law International

The UK Broadcasting Act 1996: A Holding Operation?

European Public Law , Volume 3 (2) – Jun 1, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/kluwer-law-international/the-uk-broadcasting-act-1996-a-holding-operation-Sg6VtTd8PB
Publisher
Kluwer Law International
Copyright
Copyright © Kluwer Law International
ISSN
1354-3725
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The UK Broadcasting Act 1996: A Holding Operation? Mike Feintuck* Introduction While the marketization of telecommunications services and infrastructure has proceeded apace over the last ten years in Britain, few legislative steps have been taken to address arguably the key communications issues of the present and the next century - the convergence of media technology. The latest Broadcasting Act does little to rectify this situation. Its focus is upon the development of digital terrestrial television and radio and revising the rules on concentration of media ownership. It fails to integrate broadcasting regulation into the broader, and ever more relevant, context of an increasingly international and integrated market in telecommunications, computer technology, printed media and television and radio broadcasting. As a consequence, it seems possible that British media regulators will remain in the position aptly described by Elliott in 1981 in terms of 'chasing the receding bus'.' This is not the place to expound upon the various rationales for regulating the media which have been adequately discussed e l ~ e w h e r e . ~ However, it is perhaps helpful to remember that they range from spectrum scarcity (hardly an issue in the digital age) and

Journal

European Public LawKluwer Law International

Published: Jun 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.