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The Referendum and After: Scotland’s Constitutional Future

The Referendum and After: Scotland’s Constitutional Future Tom MULLEN* 1 INTRODUCTION On 18 September 2104, the people of Scotland voted by 55% to 45% to remain in the United Kingdom, but this did not settle the question of Scotland's Constitutional Future or indeed that of the UK as a whole. Previous rapports have considered developments in the governance of Scotland up to 2011.1 This rapport tries to bring the story up to date (i.e., the end of November 2015). The lead up to the referendum began with the elections of May 2007 for the Scottish Parliament. The Scottish National Party (SNP) was the largest party and formed a minority government. In August 2007, the SNP government started a `national conversation' on Scotland's constitutional future.2 In response, the opposition parties appointed the Commission on Scottish Devolution (the `Calman Commission') in March 2008 to consider revision of the devolution settlement on the assumption that Scotland would remain in the UK. The final report of the Calman Commission made a number of proposals for revising the devolution settlement.3 These proposals were accepted by the UK government (then Labour), which promised to introduce a Bill to implement the Commissions' recommendations after the 2010 UK elections. That produced a change http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Public Law Kluwer Law International

The Referendum and After: Scotland’s Constitutional Future

European Public Law , Volume 22 (2) – Apr 1, 2016

The Referendum and After: Scotland’s Constitutional Future


Tom MULLEN* 1 INTRODUCTION On 18 September 2104, the people of Scotland voted by 55% to 45% to remain in the United Kingdom, but this did not settle the question of Scotland's Constitutional Future or indeed that of the UK as a whole. Previous rapports have considered developments in the governance of Scotland up to 2011.1 This rapport tries to bring the story up to date (i.e., the end of November 2015). The lead up to the referendum began with the elections of May 2007 for the Scottish Parliament. The Scottish National Party (SNP) was the largest party and formed a minority government. In August 2007, the SNP government started a `national conversation' on Scotland's constitutional future.2 In response, the opposition parties appointed the Commission on Scottish Devolution (the `Calman Commission') in March 2008 to consider revision of the devolution settlement on the assumption that Scotland would remain in the UK. The final report of the Calman Commission made a number of proposals for revising the devolution settlement.3 These proposals were accepted by the UK government (then Labour), which promised to introduce a Bill to implement the Commissions' recommendations after the 2010 UK elections. That produced a change of government, but the Conservative Liberal Democrat coalition renewed the commitment to further devolution and enacted the Scotland Act 2012. However, the most important changes ­ a new power to raise or lower income tax * 1 University of Glasgow. The most recent rapport was T. Mullen, `Devolution in Scotland: Increasing Autonomy?' 17 Eur. Pub. L. 399­414 (2011). Choosing Scotland's Future: A National Conversation: Independence and responsibility in the modern world Scottish Government (2007) available at: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2007/08/13103747/0. Serving Scotland Better: Scotland and the United Kingdom in the 21st Century (2009), available at: http://...
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Abstract

Tom MULLEN* 1 INTRODUCTION On 18 September 2104, the people of Scotland voted by 55% to 45% to remain in the United Kingdom, but this did not settle the question of Scotland's Constitutional Future or indeed that of the UK as a whole. Previous rapports have considered developments in the governance of Scotland up to 2011.1 This rapport tries to bring the story up to date (i.e., the end of November 2015). The lead up to the referendum began with the elections of May 2007 for the Scottish Parliament. The Scottish National Party (SNP) was the largest party and formed a minority government. In August 2007, the SNP government started a `national conversation' on Scotland's constitutional future.2 In response, the opposition parties appointed the Commission on Scottish Devolution (the `Calman Commission') in March 2008 to consider revision of the devolution settlement on the assumption that Scotland would remain in the UK. The final report of the Calman Commission made a number of proposals for revising the devolution settlement.3 These proposals were accepted by the UK government (then Labour), which promised to introduce a Bill to implement the Commissions' recommendations after the 2010 UK elections. That produced a change

Journal

European Public LawKluwer Law International

Published: Apr 1, 2016

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