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The European Parliament in EU External Relations: The Customs Union with Turkey

The European Parliament in EU External Relations: The Customs Union with Turkey European Foreign Affairs Review 5: 215­237, 2000. © 2000 Kluwer Law International. STEFAN KRAUSS* I. Introduction External relations are not typically considered to be a genuine field of parliamentary action. Governments traditionally claim the exclusive management of this domain within high politics as their privileged battleground. Historically, however, parliamentary rights of control over external relations are quite a recent phenomenon. Over the past one and a half decades, the EU has witnessed a process of parliamentarization precisely in the area where EU foreign policy activities have reached their most advanced level: of international treaty-making. Since the 1960s, the EU has been promoting its presence on the international scene by establishing a dense network of contractual links through trade, cooperation or association agreements and, as the closest form of cooperation, accession agreements. All international treaties of outstanding political significance concluded by the EU in the 1990s were subject to the approval of the European Parliament (EP). What happens when the EP interferes in international EU treaty-making? Two dimensions are to be considered. First, external treaty-making has a strong domestic bearing on the polity of the EU. To this purpose, this paper will examine the impact of the Parliament's involvement http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Foreign Affairs Review Kluwer Law International

The European Parliament in EU External Relations: The Customs Union with Turkey

European Foreign Affairs Review , Volume 5 (2) – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Kluwer Law International
Copyright
Copyright © Kluwer Law International
ISSN
1384-6299
Publisher site
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Abstract

European Foreign Affairs Review 5: 215­237, 2000. © 2000 Kluwer Law International. STEFAN KRAUSS* I. Introduction External relations are not typically considered to be a genuine field of parliamentary action. Governments traditionally claim the exclusive management of this domain within high politics as their privileged battleground. Historically, however, parliamentary rights of control over external relations are quite a recent phenomenon. Over the past one and a half decades, the EU has witnessed a process of parliamentarization precisely in the area where EU foreign policy activities have reached their most advanced level: of international treaty-making. Since the 1960s, the EU has been promoting its presence on the international scene by establishing a dense network of contractual links through trade, cooperation or association agreements and, as the closest form of cooperation, accession agreements. All international treaties of outstanding political significance concluded by the EU in the 1990s were subject to the approval of the European Parliament (EP). What happens when the EP interferes in international EU treaty-making? Two dimensions are to be considered. First, external treaty-making has a strong domestic bearing on the polity of the EU. To this purpose, this paper will examine the impact of the Parliament's involvement

Journal

European Foreign Affairs ReviewKluwer Law International

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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