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Recent Developments in Luxembourg:The Activities of the Courts in 2007

Recent Developments in Luxembourg:The Activities of the Courts in 2007 euRopean unIon Andrea Biondi and Isidora Maletic* In a year which marks the fiftieth birthday of the European Community, the Courts have exhibited renewed juvenile strength in dealing with the ever-increasing workload and its complexity. Indeed, it has been reported1 that over the past year, between the European Court of Justice (ECJ), Court of First Instance and Civil Service Tribunal, 1,259 new cases were brought, the highest figure to date. With specific regard to the ECJ, the Court's statistics for the year reveal an improvement in the functioning of judicial activities compared with the preceding year. Thus, 2007 has not only witnessed an approximate increase of ten per cent in the number of cases completed compared with 2006, but also the reduction, for the fourth consecutive year, of the duration of proceedings.2 As far as the Court of First Instance is concerned, the number of new cases brought has seen an increase from 432 in 2006 to 522 in 2007. However, the number of cases decided has decreased from 436 in 2006 to 397 over the past year. While these figures alert to the danger that the duration of proceedings may increase, they are also illustrative of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Public Law Kluwer Law International

Recent Developments in Luxembourg:The Activities of the Courts in 2007

European Public Law , Volume 14 (4) – Jan 1, 2008

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Kluwer Law International
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Copyright © Kluwer Law International
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1354-3725
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Abstract

euRopean unIon Andrea Biondi and Isidora Maletic* In a year which marks the fiftieth birthday of the European Community, the Courts have exhibited renewed juvenile strength in dealing with the ever-increasing workload and its complexity. Indeed, it has been reported1 that over the past year, between the European Court of Justice (ECJ), Court of First Instance and Civil Service Tribunal, 1,259 new cases were brought, the highest figure to date. With specific regard to the ECJ, the Court's statistics for the year reveal an improvement in the functioning of judicial activities compared with the preceding year. Thus, 2007 has not only witnessed an approximate increase of ten per cent in the number of cases completed compared with 2006, but also the reduction, for the fourth consecutive year, of the duration of proceedings.2 As far as the Court of First Instance is concerned, the number of new cases brought has seen an increase from 432 in 2006 to 522 in 2007. However, the number of cases decided has decreased from 436 in 2006 to 397 over the past year. While these figures alert to the danger that the duration of proceedings may increase, they are also illustrative of the

Journal

European Public LawKluwer Law International

Published: Jan 1, 2008

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