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Non-harmonized Implementation of a GloBE Minimum Tax: How EU Member States Could Proceed

Non-harmonized Implementation of a GloBE Minimum Tax: How EU Member States Could Proceed Since July 2021, more than 130 member countries of the G20/OECD Inclusive Framework (IF) have committed themselves to pursuing a ‘common approach’ on an international effective minimum tax regime. This political agreement implies that member countries who wish to implement such a tax regime have to streamline its design by modelling it after the so-called Global Anti-Base Erosion Proposal (‘GloBE’) that the IF has developed as ‘Pillar 2’ of its work program on tax challenges arising from the digitalization of the economy. This article explores how individual EU Member States could implement this agreement in conformity with EU fundamental freedoms also absent – or ahead of – harmonizing EU legislation to this effect. It is demonstrated that design alternatives to the often proposed extension of the carve-out for ‘substance-based’ activities exist and should be pursued. In particular, EU Member States could extend the minimum top-up tax approach to domestic entities of in-scope multinational enterprises (MNEs). Alternatively, they could also convert GloBE into a form of unitary minimum taxation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png EC Tax Review Kluwer Law International

Non-harmonized Implementation of a GloBE Minimum Tax: How EU Member States Could Proceed

EC Tax Review , Volume 30 (6): 13 – Dec 1, 2021

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Publisher
Kluwer Law International
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 Kluwer Law International BV, The Netherlands
ISSN
0928-2750
Publisher site
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Abstract

Since July 2021, more than 130 member countries of the G20/OECD Inclusive Framework (IF) have committed themselves to pursuing a ‘common approach’ on an international effective minimum tax regime. This political agreement implies that member countries who wish to implement such a tax regime have to streamline its design by modelling it after the so-called Global Anti-Base Erosion Proposal (‘GloBE’) that the IF has developed as ‘Pillar 2’ of its work program on tax challenges arising from the digitalization of the economy. This article explores how individual EU Member States could implement this agreement in conformity with EU fundamental freedoms also absent – or ahead of – harmonizing EU legislation to this effect. It is demonstrated that design alternatives to the often proposed extension of the carve-out for ‘substance-based’ activities exist and should be pursued. In particular, EU Member States could extend the minimum top-up tax approach to domestic entities of in-scope multinational enterprises (MNEs). Alternatively, they could also convert GloBE into a form of unitary minimum taxation.

Journal

EC Tax ReviewKluwer Law International

Published: Dec 1, 2021

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