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Fiscal Federalism, Fiscal Surrealism or Fiscal Realism? Regionalization of Taxing Powers in Belgium

Fiscal Federalism, Fiscal Surrealism or Fiscal Realism? Regionalization of Taxing Powers in Belgium REVIEW 2 0 1 1 ­3 ec Editorial TAX Luc De Broe, Professor of Tax Law KU Leuven, Partner Laga (Brussels) Fiscal federalism refers to a normative framework whereby various public functions and appropriate fiscal instruments for carrying out of these functions are allocated to different levels of government. In Belgium, the three regions (the Flemish, Walloon, and Brussels regions) have progressively been entrusted with autonomous taxing powers. Among others, the regions are empowered to regulate and impose twelve sorts of taxes, which were formerly levied by the Federal government (hereinafter `regional taxes'). The most important regional taxes are the annual tax on the imputed value of real property, the inheritance tax, the gift tax and the tax on the transfer of real property. The regions also have the power to provide tax surcharges or reductions on the federal personal income tax within a range of 6.75% of the revenues, which they derive from the allocated federal personal income tax. The negotiations to form a new Belgian government that are dragging on for months now are, to a large extent, concerned with the further increasing of the fiscal responsibility of the regions so that their taxing powers are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png EC Tax Review Kluwer Law International

Fiscal Federalism, Fiscal Surrealism or Fiscal Realism? Regionalization of Taxing Powers in Belgium

EC Tax Review , Volume 20 (3) – Jun 1, 2011

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Kluwer Law International
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Copyright © Kluwer Law International
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0928-2750
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Abstract

REVIEW 2 0 1 1 ­3 ec Editorial TAX Luc De Broe, Professor of Tax Law KU Leuven, Partner Laga (Brussels) Fiscal federalism refers to a normative framework whereby various public functions and appropriate fiscal instruments for carrying out of these functions are allocated to different levels of government. In Belgium, the three regions (the Flemish, Walloon, and Brussels regions) have progressively been entrusted with autonomous taxing powers. Among others, the regions are empowered to regulate and impose twelve sorts of taxes, which were formerly levied by the Federal government (hereinafter `regional taxes'). The most important regional taxes are the annual tax on the imputed value of real property, the inheritance tax, the gift tax and the tax on the transfer of real property. The regions also have the power to provide tax surcharges or reductions on the federal personal income tax within a range of 6.75% of the revenues, which they derive from the allocated federal personal income tax. The negotiations to form a new Belgian government that are dragging on for months now are, to a large extent, concerned with the further increasing of the fiscal responsibility of the regions so that their taxing powers are

Journal

EC Tax ReviewKluwer Law International

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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