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An X-Ray Investigation of Pharyngeal Constriction in American English Schwa

An X-Ray Investigation of Pharyngeal Constriction in American English Schwa A study of early X-ray footage of 4 subjects was conducted to test the prediction that there may be a midpharyngeal constriction in American English schwa. Results show a significant constriction during schwa relative to lingual rest position for all 4 speakers. This evidence contradicts views of American English schwa as having no articulatory target or place features, as well as those which have suggested a neutral target throughout the vocal tract. These findings, however, support claims connecting English schwa with reduced /r/. In addition to the basic effect 1 subject showed a bimodal pattern in schwa, which may indicate that this subject has distinct schwas in lexical vs. functional words, a property that has also been observed with respect to /r/ in r-vocalizing dialects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Phonetica Karger

An X-Ray Investigation of Pharyngeal Constriction in American English Schwa

Phonetica , Volume 59 (1): 11 – Mar 1, 2002

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References (28)

Publisher
Karger
Copyright
© 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel
ISSN
0031-8388
eISSN
1423-0321
DOI
10.1159/000056204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A study of early X-ray footage of 4 subjects was conducted to test the prediction that there may be a midpharyngeal constriction in American English schwa. Results show a significant constriction during schwa relative to lingual rest position for all 4 speakers. This evidence contradicts views of American English schwa as having no articulatory target or place features, as well as those which have suggested a neutral target throughout the vocal tract. These findings, however, support claims connecting English schwa with reduced /r/. In addition to the basic effect 1 subject showed a bimodal pattern in schwa, which may indicate that this subject has distinct schwas in lexical vs. functional words, a property that has also been observed with respect to /r/ in r-vocalizing dialects.

Journal

PhoneticaKarger

Published: Mar 1, 2002

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