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Garryowen and the Giltraps

Garryowen and the Giltraps VIVIEN IGOE James Joyce would certainly have heard about Garryowen, the champion Irish Red Setter, from his aunt Josephine. Quite apart from that source, Garryowen was a household name in the latter decades of the nineteenth century. John Stanislaus and his cronies would have smoked Spillane’s Garryowen Flake, a pipe tobacco, which was named after James Giltrap’s famous red setter (Plate 8). James J. Giltrap (1832–99), a law agent, was a well-known and successful dog breeder who was particularly associated with the Irish red setter. He was the owner and breeder of the dog Garryowen. Mrs Giltrap also bred and showed dogs and had much success with her pompadours and pugs in Dublin from the mid-eighteen seventies onwards. In fact there was a special ‘Giltrap Cup’ awarded for the best pug at the Dog Show held at the Zoolological Gardens in September 1883. The Giltrap’s daughter Josephine married William A. Murray a brother of Mary Jane Murray, who was Joyce’s mother. Josephine first met Murray when he worked as an accountant in her father ’s law firm at 2 Morgan Place beside the Four Courts in Dublin. Giltrap loved his dogs and his life revolved around them. From the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dublin James Joyce Journal James Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin

Garryowen and the Giltraps

Dublin James Joyce Journal , Volume 2 – Mar 2, 2012

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Publisher
James Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin
ISSN
2009-4507

Abstract

VIVIEN IGOE James Joyce would certainly have heard about Garryowen, the champion Irish Red Setter, from his aunt Josephine. Quite apart from that source, Garryowen was a household name in the latter decades of the nineteenth century. John Stanislaus and his cronies would have smoked Spillane’s Garryowen Flake, a pipe tobacco, which was named after James Giltrap’s famous red setter (Plate 8). James J. Giltrap (1832–99), a law agent, was a well-known and successful dog breeder who was particularly associated with the Irish red setter. He was the owner and breeder of the dog Garryowen. Mrs Giltrap also bred and showed dogs and had much success with her pompadours and pugs in Dublin from the mid-eighteen seventies onwards. In fact there was a special ‘Giltrap Cup’ awarded for the best pug at the Dog Show held at the Zoolological Gardens in September 1883. The Giltrap’s daughter Josephine married William A. Murray a brother of Mary Jane Murray, who was Joyce’s mother. Josephine first met Murray when he worked as an accountant in her father ’s law firm at 2 Morgan Place beside the Four Courts in Dublin. Giltrap loved his dogs and his life revolved around them. From the

Journal

Dublin James Joyce JournalJames Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin

Published: Mar 2, 2012

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