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'Museum With Those Goddesses': Bloom and the Dublin Plaster Casts

'Museum With Those Goddesses': Bloom and the Dublin Plaster Casts FINTAN CULLEN ‘MUSEUM WITH THOSE GODDESSES’: BLOOM AND THE DUBLIN PLASTER CASTS During the second half of the nineteenth century, as Dublin established its own public art gallery and museum, the display of white plaster casts of well- known Greco-Roman statuary dominated the visitor ’s first encounter with the collections housed in these new temples of art. The National Gallery of Ireland, in Merrion Square, opened its doors in 1864 while a Museum of Science and Art, which eventually became the National Museum of Ireland, situated only a short distance away on Kildare Street, was accessible to visitors from 1890. Both of these state-funded institutions, in the early decades of their existence, displayed classical casts in their entrance halls or first rooms and such an introduction coloured the whole visiting experience. As museum culture developed in the nineteenth century, many art institutions in Europe and North America displayed authentic classical statuary or casts in their entrance halls or rotundas so as to assuage contemporary fears that the art viewer would be bombarded with the new and/or the unknown. In 1828, the architect of Berlin’s Altes Museum, Karl Friedrich Schinkel and the Museum’s first director, Gustav Friedrich Waagen, were of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dublin James Joyce Journal James Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin

'Museum With Those Goddesses': Bloom and the Dublin Plaster Casts

Dublin James Joyce Journal , Volume 2 – Mar 2, 2012

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Publisher
James Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin
ISSN
2009-4507

Abstract

FINTAN CULLEN ‘MUSEUM WITH THOSE GODDESSES’: BLOOM AND THE DUBLIN PLASTER CASTS During the second half of the nineteenth century, as Dublin established its own public art gallery and museum, the display of white plaster casts of well- known Greco-Roman statuary dominated the visitor ’s first encounter with the collections housed in these new temples of art. The National Gallery of Ireland, in Merrion Square, opened its doors in 1864 while a Museum of Science and Art, which eventually became the National Museum of Ireland, situated only a short distance away on Kildare Street, was accessible to visitors from 1890. Both of these state-funded institutions, in the early decades of their existence, displayed classical casts in their entrance halls or first rooms and such an introduction coloured the whole visiting experience. As museum culture developed in the nineteenth century, many art institutions in Europe and North America displayed authentic classical statuary or casts in their entrance halls or rotundas so as to assuage contemporary fears that the art viewer would be bombarded with the new and/or the unknown. In 1828, the architect of Berlin’s Altes Museum, Karl Friedrich Schinkel and the Museum’s first director, Gustav Friedrich Waagen, were of

Journal

Dublin James Joyce JournalJames Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin

Published: Mar 2, 2012

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