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'Famished Ghosts': Bloom, Bible Wars, and 'U.P. Up' In Joyce's Dublin

'Famished Ghosts': Bloom, Bible Wars, and 'U.P. Up' In Joyce's Dublin LUKE GIBBONS ‘FAMISHED GHOSTS’: BLOOM, BIBLE WARS, AND ‘U.P. UP’ IN JOYCE’S DUBLIN Soup, joint and sweet. Never know whose thoughts you’re chewing. […] Famished ghosts. Ah, I’m hungry (U 8.717–8 and 730–1). One of the traumatic aspects of the ‘nightmare of history’ in Ulysses is that the past is not confined to dream but may visit its terrors again on the present. ‘Coming events cast their shadow before’ (U 8.526): in recapitulating what has already happened, dreams may also cast a dark shadow on the future. One such nightmare wakes up Denis Breen in a panic attack in the ‘Lestrygonians’ episode, as reported by his wife to Bloom on Westmoreland Street: –Woke me up in the night, she said. Dream he had, a nightmare. Indiges. –Said the ace of spades was walking up the stairs. –The ace of spades! Mr Bloom said. She took a folded postcard from her handbag. –Read that, she said. He got it this morning. –What is it? Mr Bloom asked, taking the card. U. P.? –U. p: up, she said. Someone taking a rise out of him. It’s a great shame for them whoever he is. –Indeed it is, Mr Bloom said. She http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dublin James Joyce Journal James Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin

'Famished Ghosts': Bloom, Bible Wars, and 'U.P. Up' In Joyce's Dublin

Dublin James Joyce Journal , Volume 2 – Mar 2, 2012

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Publisher
James Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin
ISSN
2009-4507

Abstract

LUKE GIBBONS ‘FAMISHED GHOSTS’: BLOOM, BIBLE WARS, AND ‘U.P. UP’ IN JOYCE’S DUBLIN Soup, joint and sweet. Never know whose thoughts you’re chewing. […] Famished ghosts. Ah, I’m hungry (U 8.717–8 and 730–1). One of the traumatic aspects of the ‘nightmare of history’ in Ulysses is that the past is not confined to dream but may visit its terrors again on the present. ‘Coming events cast their shadow before’ (U 8.526): in recapitulating what has already happened, dreams may also cast a dark shadow on the future. One such nightmare wakes up Denis Breen in a panic attack in the ‘Lestrygonians’ episode, as reported by his wife to Bloom on Westmoreland Street: –Woke me up in the night, she said. Dream he had, a nightmare. Indiges. –Said the ace of spades was walking up the stairs. –The ace of spades! Mr Bloom said. She took a folded postcard from her handbag. –Read that, she said. He got it this morning. –What is it? Mr Bloom asked, taking the card. U. P.? –U. p: up, she said. Someone taking a rise out of him. It’s a great shame for them whoever he is. –Indeed it is, Mr Bloom said. She

Journal

Dublin James Joyce JournalJames Joyce Research Center @ University College Dublin

Published: Mar 2, 2012

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