Missing Corresponding Author Information and Error in Supplement Note

Missing Corresponding Author Information and Error in Supplement Note Letters compulsive disorder and sleep disorders, CBT is virtually the CORRECTION only treatment that has been studied in randomized clinical OmittedDisclosureofPotentialConflictsofInterest: IntheViewpointtitled“The trials. This does not necessarily imply that other treatments Iatrogenic Potential of the Physician’s Words” published in the December 26, 2017, issue of JAMA, the author omitted disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. The are not efficacious or less efficacious than CBT. With regard disclosure statement should include the following: “Dr Barsky reported having to bulimia, most studies do not show that CBT is superior to, served as an expert witness in cases that involved providing opinions on the rela- for example, psychodynamic therapy. tionship between somatic symptoms and underlying disease processes.” This ar- With response rates of about 50% or less and even lower ticle was corrected online. remission rates, CBT cannot claim to be a panacea. Patients who 1. Barsky AJ. The iatrogenic potential of the physician’s words. JAMA. 2017;318 (24):2425-2426. do not benefit sufficiently from CBT may benefit from other psychotherapies. In pharmacotherapy, for example, a patient Errors in Text and Supplement: In the Original Investigation entitled “Associa- who does not sufficiently respond to a specific selective sero- tion Between Use of Non–Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants With and Without Con- tonin reuptake inhibitor may be offered an alternative medi- current Medications and Risk of Major Bleeding in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation” published in the October 3, 2017, issue of JAMA, the incorrect mechanism of ac- cation. Thus, a plurality of approaches not only including the tion for 2 drugs, rifampin and phenytoin, was reported in the text and Supple- variants of CBT mentioned by van Emmerik and colleagues but ment. In the Methods, the final sentence under Follow-up Time and Person- also the variants of other evidence-based approaches is needed Quarters should read: “These medications were selected because they were to offer all patients helpful treatment. A plurality of different P-glycoprotein competitors (digoxin, verapamil, diltiazem, amiodarone, and cy- closporine), CYP3A4 inhibitors (fluconazole and ketoconazole, itraconazole, vori- approaches allows better care for patients and possible fur- conazole, or posaconazole), or both (atorvastatin, erythromycin or clarithromy- ther treatment improvements. No form of psychotherapy may cin, dronedarone) or CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin and phenytoin), which may have presently claim to be the best for all patients. a potential drug-drug interaction with NOACs.” In the Results, the first sentence in the final paragraph under Sensitivity and Additional Analyses should read: “In Thus, we agree with DeRubeis and Lorenzo-Luaces the third additional analysis, 12 concurrent medications were categorized into 2 who stated: “If the question at hand is whether research is metabolic pathway groups: P-glycoprotein competitors group (digoxin, verapa- far enough along to support the view that only CBTs should mil, diltiazem, amiodarone, and cyclosporine) and both P-glycoprotein competi- be investigated, taught in training programs, and offered to tors and CYP3A4 inhibitors group (atorvastatin; fluconazole; ketoconazole, itra- conazole, voriconazole, or posaconazole; erythromycin or clarithromycin; and individuals with mental health problems, then the answer dronedarone).” Additionally, the footnote in eTable 7 of the Supplement should is clearly ‘no’.” read: “P, C: Atorvastatin, Fluconazole, Ketoconazole, Itraconazole, Voriconazole, Posaconazole, Clarithromycin, Erythromycin, Dronedarone, P: Digoxin, Verapa- mil, Diltiazem, Amiodarone, Cyclosporin.” This article was corrected online. Falk Leichsenring, DSc 1. Chang SH, Chou IJ, Yeh YH, et al. Association between use of non–vitamin K Christiane Steinert, PhD oral anticoagulants with and without concurrent medications and risk of major bleeding in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. JAMA. 2017;318(13):1250-1259. Author Affiliations: Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany (Leichsenring); Department of Psychology, MSB Medical School Berlin, Berlin, Germany (Steinert). Missing Corresponding Author Information and Error in Supplement Note: In the Original Contribution entitled “Association of Insulin Pump Therapy vs Insulin Corresponding Author: Falk Leichsenring, DSc, Department of Psychosomatics Injection Therapy With Severe Hypoglycemia, Ketoacidosis, and Glycemic Con- and Psychotherapy, University of Giessen, Ludwigstr 76, 35392 Giessen, trol Among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes” pub- Germany (falk.leichsenring@psycho.med.uni-giessen.de). lished in the October 10, 2017, issue of JAMA, contact information for the corre- Conflict of Interest Disclosures: The authors have completed and submitted sponding author was missing and there was an error in a note in the Supplement. the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none were On the first page of the article, the corresponding author’s contact information reported. should have appeared below the affiliations information. In the online Supple- ment, the information after the asterisk in the eFigure 1 legend should have read 1. Cuijpers P, Cristea IA, Karyotaki E, Reijnders M, Huibers MJ. How effective “denotes P values <.05 and.001.” This article was corrected online. are cognitive behavior therapies for major depression and anxiety disorders? a meta-analytic update of the evidence. World Psychiatry. 2016;15(3):245-258. 1. Karges B, Schwandt A, Heidtmann B, et al. Association of insulin pump therapy vs insulin injection therapy with severe hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, 2. Johnsen TJ, Friborg O. The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy as an and glycemic control among children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 anti-depressive treatment is falling: a meta-analysis. Psychol Bull. 2015;141(4): diabetes. JAMA. 2017;318(14):1358-1366. 747-768. 3. Öst L-G. Cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders: 40 years of Incorrect Unit in Laboratory Value: In the US Preventive Services Task Force Rec- progress. Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(suppl 47):5-10. ommendation Statement entitled “Screening for Preeclampsia: US Preventive Ser- 4. Roy-Byrne P. Transdiagnostic cognitive behavioral therapy and the return of 1 vices Task Force Recommendation Statement” published in the April 25, 2017, is- the repressed. JAMA Psychiatry. 2017;74(9):867-868. sue of JAMA, a unit reported with a laboratory value was incorrect. Near the end 5. Stefini A, Salzer S, Reich G, et al. Cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic of the “Screening Tests” subsection of the “Clinical Considerations” section, “pro- therapy in female adolescents with bulimia nervosa: a randomized controlled tein to creatinine ratio of 0.3 mg/mmol” should have read “protein to creatine trial. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017;56(4):329-335. ratio of0.3 [each measured as mg/dL].” This article was corrected online. 6. DeRubeis RJ, Lorenzo-Luaces L. Recognizing that truth is unattainable and 1. Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, et al; US Preventive Services attending to the most informative research evidence. Psychother Res. 2017;27 Task Force. Screening for preeclampsia: US Preventive Services Task Force (1):33-35. recommendation statement. JAMA. 2017;317(16):1661-1667. jama.com (Reprinted) JAMA February 27, 2018 Volume 319, Number 8 833 © 2018 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Missing Corresponding Author Information and Error in Supplement Note

JAMA , Volume 319 (8) – Feb 27, 2018
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Abstract

Letters compulsive disorder and sleep disorders, CBT is virtually the CORRECTION only treatment that has been studied in randomized clinical OmittedDisclosureofPotentialConflictsofInterest: IntheViewpointtitled“The trials. This does not necessarily imply that other treatments Iatrogenic Potential of the Physician’s Words” published in the December 26, 2017, issue of JAMA, the author omitted disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. The are not efficacious or less efficacious than CBT. With regard disclosure statement should include the following: “Dr Barsky reported having to bulimia, most studies do not show that CBT is superior to, served as an expert witness in cases that involved providing opinions on the rela- for example, psychodynamic therapy. tionship between somatic symptoms and underlying disease processes.” This ar- With response rates of about 50% or less and even lower ticle was corrected online. remission rates, CBT cannot claim to be a panacea. Patients who 1. Barsky AJ. The iatrogenic potential of the physician’s words. JAMA. 2017;318 (24):2425-2426. do not benefit sufficiently from CBT may benefit from other psychotherapies. In pharmacotherapy, for example, a patient Errors in Text and Supplement: In the Original Investigation entitled “Associa- who does not sufficiently respond to a specific selective sero- tion Between Use of Non–Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants With and Without Con- tonin reuptake inhibitor may be offered an alternative medi- current Medications and Risk of Major Bleeding in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation” published in the October 3, 2017, issue of JAMA, the incorrect mechanism of ac- cation. Thus, a plurality of approaches not only including the tion for 2 drugs, rifampin and phenytoin, was reported in the text and Supple- variants of CBT mentioned by van Emmerik and colleagues but ment. In the Methods, the final sentence under Follow-up Time and Person- also the variants of other evidence-based approaches is needed Quarters should read: “These medications were selected because they were to offer all patients helpful treatment. A plurality of different P-glycoprotein competitors (digoxin, verapamil, diltiazem, amiodarone, and cy- closporine), CYP3A4 inhibitors (fluconazole and ketoconazole, itraconazole, vori- approaches allows better care for patients and possible fur- conazole, or posaconazole), or both (atorvastatin, erythromycin or clarithromy- ther treatment improvements. No form of psychotherapy may cin, dronedarone) or CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin and phenytoin), which may have presently claim to be the best for all patients. a potential drug-drug interaction with NOACs.” In the Results, the first sentence in the final paragraph under Sensitivity and Additional Analyses should read: “In Thus, we agree with DeRubeis and Lorenzo-Luaces the third additional analysis, 12 concurrent medications were categorized into 2 who stated: “If the question at hand is whether research is metabolic pathway groups: P-glycoprotein competitors group (digoxin, verapa- far enough along to support the view that only CBTs should mil, diltiazem, amiodarone, and cyclosporine) and both P-glycoprotein competi- be investigated, taught in training programs, and offered to tors and CYP3A4 inhibitors group (atorvastatin; fluconazole; ketoconazole, itra- conazole, voriconazole, or posaconazole; erythromycin or clarithromycin; and individuals with mental health problems, then the answer dronedarone).” Additionally, the footnote in eTable 7 of the Supplement should is clearly ‘no’.” read: “P, C: Atorvastatin, Fluconazole, Ketoconazole, Itraconazole, Voriconazole, Posaconazole, Clarithromycin, Erythromycin, Dronedarone, P: Digoxin, Verapa- mil, Diltiazem, Amiodarone, Cyclosporin.” This article was corrected online. Falk Leichsenring, DSc 1. Chang SH, Chou IJ, Yeh YH, et al. Association between use of non–vitamin K Christiane Steinert, PhD oral anticoagulants with and without concurrent medications and risk of major bleeding in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. JAMA. 2017;318(13):1250-1259. Author Affiliations: Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany (Leichsenring); Department of Psychology, MSB Medical School Berlin, Berlin, Germany (Steinert). Missing Corresponding Author Information and Error in Supplement Note: In the Original Contribution entitled “Association of Insulin Pump Therapy vs Insulin Corresponding Author: Falk Leichsenring, DSc, Department of Psychosomatics Injection Therapy With Severe Hypoglycemia, Ketoacidosis, and Glycemic Con- and Psychotherapy, University of Giessen, Ludwigstr 76, 35392 Giessen, trol Among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes” pub- Germany (falk.leichsenring@psycho.med.uni-giessen.de). lished in the October 10, 2017, issue of JAMA, contact information for the corre- Conflict of Interest Disclosures: The authors have completed and submitted sponding author was missing and there was an error in a note in the Supplement. the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none were On the first page of the article, the corresponding author’s contact information reported. should have appeared below the affiliations information. In the online Supple- ment, the information after the asterisk in the eFigure 1 legend should have read 1. Cuijpers P, Cristea IA, Karyotaki E, Reijnders M, Huibers MJ. How effective “denotes P values <.05 and.001.” This article was corrected online. are cognitive behavior therapies for major depression and anxiety disorders? a meta-analytic update of the evidence. World Psychiatry. 2016;15(3):245-258. 1. Karges B, Schwandt A, Heidtmann B, et al. Association of insulin pump therapy vs insulin injection therapy with severe hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis, 2. Johnsen TJ, Friborg O. The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy as an and glycemic control among children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 anti-depressive treatment is falling: a meta-analysis. Psychol Bull. 2015;141(4): diabetes. JAMA. 2017;318(14):1358-1366. 747-768. 3. Öst L-G. Cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders: 40 years of Incorrect Unit in Laboratory Value: In the US Preventive Services Task Force Rec- progress. Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(suppl 47):5-10. ommendation Statement entitled “Screening for Preeclampsia: US Preventive Ser- 4. Roy-Byrne P. Transdiagnostic cognitive behavioral therapy and the return of 1 vices Task Force Recommendation Statement” published in the April 25, 2017, is- the repressed. JAMA Psychiatry. 2017;74(9):867-868. sue of JAMA, a unit reported with a laboratory value was incorrect. Near the end 5. Stefini A, Salzer S, Reich G, et al. Cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic of the “Screening Tests” subsection of the “Clinical Considerations” section, “pro- therapy in female adolescents with bulimia nervosa: a randomized controlled tein to creatinine ratio of 0.3 mg/mmol” should have read “protein to creatine trial. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2017;56(4):329-335. ratio of0.3 [each measured as mg/dL].” This article was corrected online. 6. DeRubeis RJ, Lorenzo-Luaces L. Recognizing that truth is unattainable and 1. Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, et al; US Preventive Services attending to the most informative research evidence. Psychother Res. 2017;27 Task Force. Screening for preeclampsia: US Preventive Services Task Force (1):33-35. recommendation statement. JAMA. 2017;317(16):1661-1667. jama.com (Reprinted) JAMA February 27, 2018 Volume 319, Number 8 833 © 2018 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 27, 2018

References

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