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Developmental Systems Theory and the Person-Oriented Approach

Developmental Systems Theory and the Person-Oriented Approach Molenaar’s (2015) article concerns Developmental Systems Theory (DST) in relation to behavior genetics and he presents implications of DST for empirical research, especially the need for subject-specific studies. In this commentary, the article is discussed from a broader developmental science perspective, particularly regarded through the lens of the person-oriented approach. It is pointed out that a pattern perspective is given little attention, although it is central to many modern theoretical frameworks in developmental science. The quest for models that match DST theoretical conceptualizations is also discussed, for instance the basic endeavor to find a universal model and the need to clarify what constitutes good model fit.A Developmental Science PerspectiveBasic concepts and theoretical frameworks for a modern developmental science have been formulated by developmentalists like Urie Bronfenbrenner, Robert Cairns, Dante Cicchetti, Gilbert Gottlieb, and David Magnusson. Bergman (2012) has summarized common key elements of such theories from which the following tenets are abstracted:1.The concern is with individual development, not group development.2.The individual is regarded as a “functioning whole”.3.A multilevel systems perspective is taken.4.System components interact through development.System components interact through development. Developmental Systems Theory (DST) as presented in Molenaar’s article (2015) is in many respects aligned to the tenets outlined http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Developmental Science iospress

Developmental Systems Theory and the Person-Oriented Approach

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
2192-001X
DOI
10.3233/DEV-15162
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Molenaar’s (2015) article concerns Developmental Systems Theory (DST) in relation to behavior genetics and he presents implications of DST for empirical research, especially the need for subject-specific studies. In this commentary, the article is discussed from a broader developmental science perspective, particularly regarded through the lens of the person-oriented approach. It is pointed out that a pattern perspective is given little attention, although it is central to many modern theoretical frameworks in developmental science. The quest for models that match DST theoretical conceptualizations is also discussed, for instance the basic endeavor to find a universal model and the need to clarify what constitutes good model fit.A Developmental Science PerspectiveBasic concepts and theoretical frameworks for a modern developmental science have been formulated by developmentalists like Urie Bronfenbrenner, Robert Cairns, Dante Cicchetti, Gilbert Gottlieb, and David Magnusson. Bergman (2012) has summarized common key elements of such theories from which the following tenets are abstracted:1.The concern is with individual development, not group development.2.The individual is regarded as a “functioning whole”.3.A multilevel systems perspective is taken.4.System components interact through development.System components interact through development. Developmental Systems Theory (DST) as presented in Molenaar’s article (2015) is in many respects aligned to the tenets outlined

Journal

International Journal of Developmental Scienceiospress

Published: May 15, 2015

References