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Aging research using the common marmoset: Focus on aging interventions

Aging research using the common marmoset: Focus on aging interventions Traditional animal models have been used to make seminal discoveries in biomedical research including a better understanding of the biology of the aging process. However, translation of these findings from laboratory to clinical populations has likely been hindered due to fundamental biological and physiological differences between common laboratory animals and humans. Non-human primates (NHP) may serve as an effective bridge towards translation, and short-lived NHP like the common marmoset offer many advantages as models for aging research. Here, we address these advantages and discuss what is currently understood about the changes in physiology and pathology that occur with age in the marmoset. In addition, we discuss how aging research might best utilize this model resource, and outline an ongoing study to address whether pharmaceutical intervention can slow aging in the marmoset. With this manuscript, we clarify how common marmosets might assist researchers in geroscience as a potential model for pre-clinical translation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition and Healthy Aging iospress

Aging research using the common marmoset: Focus on aging interventions

Nutrition and Healthy Aging , Volume 5 (2): 13 – Jan 1, 2019

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 © 2019 – IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
2451-9480
eISSN
2451-9502
DOI
10.3233/NHA-180046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traditional animal models have been used to make seminal discoveries in biomedical research including a better understanding of the biology of the aging process. However, translation of these findings from laboratory to clinical populations has likely been hindered due to fundamental biological and physiological differences between common laboratory animals and humans. Non-human primates (NHP) may serve as an effective bridge towards translation, and short-lived NHP like the common marmoset offer many advantages as models for aging research. Here, we address these advantages and discuss what is currently understood about the changes in physiology and pathology that occur with age in the marmoset. In addition, we discuss how aging research might best utilize this model resource, and outline an ongoing study to address whether pharmaceutical intervention can slow aging in the marmoset. With this manuscript, we clarify how common marmosets might assist researchers in geroscience as a potential model for pre-clinical translation.

Journal

Nutrition and Healthy Agingiospress

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References