Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

URLs Link Rot: Implications for Electronic Publishing

URLs Link Rot: Implications for Electronic Publishing AbstractIn recent years the authors of scholarly publications have relied on e-resources. But e-resources have raised the question of permanency on the web. In this context, this article investigates the availability, persistence of Uniform Resource Locator (URL) citations cited in two Library and Information Science (LIS) journal articles published by Emerald Publishers during 2008 and 2012. In total, 2477 URLs cited in 406 research articles published in two LIS journals spanning a period of five years (2008–2012) were extracted. The study found that 23.81 per cent (2,477 out of 10,400 references) of URLs were cited in these journal articles. 49.53 per cent of URL citations were not accessible and the remaining 51.47 per cent of URL citations were still accessible. The study used W3C link checker to identify HTTP errors associated with missing URLs. HTTP 500 error message—‘page not found’ was the overwhelming message that represented 39.18 per cent of all HTTP error messages. This study attempts to focus on URLs link rot and its implications for electronic publishing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Digital Libraries - An international journal IOS Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ios-press/urls-link-rot-implications-for-electronic-publishing-UeWtNarBlP

References (9)

Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
0974-567X
DOI
10.18329/09757597/2015/8105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn recent years the authors of scholarly publications have relied on e-resources. But e-resources have raised the question of permanency on the web. In this context, this article investigates the availability, persistence of Uniform Resource Locator (URL) citations cited in two Library and Information Science (LIS) journal articles published by Emerald Publishers during 2008 and 2012. In total, 2477 URLs cited in 406 research articles published in two LIS journals spanning a period of five years (2008–2012) were extracted. The study found that 23.81 per cent (2,477 out of 10,400 references) of URLs were cited in these journal articles. 49.53 per cent of URL citations were not accessible and the remaining 51.47 per cent of URL citations were still accessible. The study used W3C link checker to identify HTTP errors associated with missing URLs. HTTP 500 error message—‘page not found’ was the overwhelming message that represented 39.18 per cent of all HTTP error messages. This study attempts to focus on URLs link rot and its implications for electronic publishing.

Journal

World Digital Libraries - An international journalIOS Press

Published: Sep 12, 2015

There are no references for this article.