SEER: A Divergent Methodology Applied to Forecasting the Future Roles of the Systems Analyst

SEER: A Divergent Methodology Applied to Forecasting the Future Roles of the Systems Analyst Predicting evolutionary changes is perilous at best. Rather than choose a recognized method for convergence of ideas such as Delphi, we chose to develop a technique that emphasizes differences of opinion. We call this method SEER, which stands for Scenario Exploration, Elaboration, and Review. In this paper we examine four scenarios that might influence major changes in the roles of information systems analysts as we approach the twenty-first century. By elaborating on the four scenarios (overburdening the analyst, overbuilding systems, the myth of control, and the inflexible organization) it became apparent that the roles of the analyst will change. Although we explain how we constantly differ from one another, we conclude by identifying four underlying themes we have in common and by recognizing an ordered structure for these differences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Systems Management IOS Press

SEER: A Divergent Methodology Applied to Forecasting the Future Roles of the Systems Analyst

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ios-press/seer-a-divergent-methodology-applied-to-forecasting-the-future-roles-WyCmtcJeZr
Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
0167-2533
eISSN
1875-8703
DOI
10.3233/HSM-1992-11303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Predicting evolutionary changes is perilous at best. Rather than choose a recognized method for convergence of ideas such as Delphi, we chose to develop a technique that emphasizes differences of opinion. We call this method SEER, which stands for Scenario Exploration, Elaboration, and Review. In this paper we examine four scenarios that might influence major changes in the roles of information systems analysts as we approach the twenty-first century. By elaborating on the four scenarios (overburdening the analyst, overbuilding systems, the myth of control, and the inflexible organization) it became apparent that the roles of the analyst will change. Although we explain how we constantly differ from one another, we conclude by identifying four underlying themes we have in common and by recognizing an ordered structure for these differences.

Journal

Human Systems ManagementIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 1992

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off