Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Four types of integration in disability identity development

Four types of integration in disability identity development Integration is a recurrent theme in classic theories of personality development, reflecting the perennial human struggle to resolve opposing pulls toward separation and unity. Identity development is examined in this paper as a particular case of the striving for integration on both individual and group levels. In the context of minority identity development, the steps toward achieving a sound disabiltiy identity are discussed with respect to intrapsychic, interpersonal, and social dynamics. Four types of integration underlying disability identity development are delineated with examples: (1) ‘coming to feel we belong’ (integrating into society); (2) ‘coming home’ (integrating with the disability community); (3) ‘coming together’ (internally integrating our sameness and differentness); and (4) ‘coming out’ (integrating how we feel with how we present ourselves). The paper ends with a discussion of the significance of this integration process for personal empowerment and disability rights activism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation IOS Press

Four types of integration in disability identity development

Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation , Volume 9 (1) – Jan 1, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ios-press/four-types-of-integration-in-disability-identity-development-yaeqgSflVQ
Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
1052-2263
eISSN
1878-6316
DOI
10.3233/JVR-1997-9106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Integration is a recurrent theme in classic theories of personality development, reflecting the perennial human struggle to resolve opposing pulls toward separation and unity. Identity development is examined in this paper as a particular case of the striving for integration on both individual and group levels. In the context of minority identity development, the steps toward achieving a sound disabiltiy identity are discussed with respect to intrapsychic, interpersonal, and social dynamics. Four types of integration underlying disability identity development are delineated with examples: (1) ‘coming to feel we belong’ (integrating into society); (2) ‘coming home’ (integrating with the disability community); (3) ‘coming together’ (internally integrating our sameness and differentness); and (4) ‘coming out’ (integrating how we feel with how we present ourselves). The paper ends with a discussion of the significance of this integration process for personal empowerment and disability rights activism.

Journal

Journal of Vocational RehabilitationIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.