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Cross-cultural IS adoption in multinational corporations

Cross-cultural IS adoption in multinational corporations A common claim in the literature on Information Systems' implementation in the context of less developed economies or so-called "developing countries" is that the "Western" technology is at odds with the local cultural context, in particular it is believed to mismatch local rationality in the sense of the accepted ways of doing things. In this paper we investigate IS implementation in a company based in a "non-Western" context compared with IS adoption in another company in a "Western" country context. Seen as a particular form of decision-making, the adoption and implementation processes are analysed drawing on the literature on decision-making, rationality in "Western" and "non-Western" contexts. Presenting evidence from these two contexts we argue that multiple forms of rationality exist in any context and that national culture is only one aspect of actors' as well as researchers' sense-making of activities in any given context. Linking the cases back the literature we reflect on the implications of our findings for cross-cultural research of IT implementation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Technology for Development iospress

Cross-cultural IS adoption in multinational corporations

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
0268-1102
DOI
10.1002/itdj.1590100404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A common claim in the literature on Information Systems' implementation in the context of less developed economies or so-called "developing countries" is that the "Western" technology is at odds with the local cultural context, in particular it is believed to mismatch local rationality in the sense of the accepted ways of doing things. In this paper we investigate IS implementation in a company based in a "non-Western" context compared with IS adoption in another company in a "Western" country context. Seen as a particular form of decision-making, the adoption and implementation processes are analysed drawing on the literature on decision-making, rationality in "Western" and "non-Western" contexts. Presenting evidence from these two contexts we argue that multiple forms of rationality exist in any context and that national culture is only one aspect of actors' as well as researchers' sense-making of activities in any given context. Linking the cases back the literature we reflect on the implications of our findings for cross-cultural research of IT implementation.

Journal

Information Technology for Developmentiospress

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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