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Comparing Risk- and Non-Risk-Groups is a Favored Approach in Developmental Psychopathology

Comparing Risk- and Non-Risk-Groups is a Favored Approach in Developmental Psychopathology Comparing risk- and non-risk-groups, as is done in the study by Witting, Ruiz, and Ahnert (2016), is a favored approach in developmental psychopathology in order to learn more about underlying mechanisms of normal development, as well as developmental deviations (Sroufe & Rutter, 1984). Such an approach is best suited to inform practice about early prevention, e.g. for preterm born children. Witting and colleagues followed up this strategy to study variations in attachment mechanisms, comparing preterm and term born children in their case study, even including a boy with an extremely low birth weight of 460 g. They observed the boys in the laboratory in Ainsworth’s Strange Situation (SS) as well as in their home using Water’s Attachment Q-Sort (AQS), coded their attachment strategies, developed rating scales with regard to arousal and regulation at the behavioral level and assessed cortisol levels before and after the SS. They have thereby used a multilevel and multi-method approach as highly recommended by developmental psychopathologists (e.g., Leve & Chicchetti, 2016).However, unfortunately, assessments at the representational level, which would have been important to address fathers’ “understanding of the vulnerability in their babies, especially in stressful situations”, were left out, even though this issue was raised by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Developmental Science iospress

Comparing Risk- and Non-Risk-Groups is a Favored Approach in Developmental Psychopathology

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
2192-001X
DOI
10.3233/DEV-16196
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Comparing risk- and non-risk-groups, as is done in the study by Witting, Ruiz, and Ahnert (2016), is a favored approach in developmental psychopathology in order to learn more about underlying mechanisms of normal development, as well as developmental deviations (Sroufe & Rutter, 1984). Such an approach is best suited to inform practice about early prevention, e.g. for preterm born children. Witting and colleagues followed up this strategy to study variations in attachment mechanisms, comparing preterm and term born children in their case study, even including a boy with an extremely low birth weight of 460 g. They observed the boys in the laboratory in Ainsworth’s Strange Situation (SS) as well as in their home using Water’s Attachment Q-Sort (AQS), coded their attachment strategies, developed rating scales with regard to arousal and regulation at the behavioral level and assessed cortisol levels before and after the SS. They have thereby used a multilevel and multi-method approach as highly recommended by developmental psychopathologists (e.g., Leve & Chicchetti, 2016).However, unfortunately, assessments at the representational level, which would have been important to address fathers’ “understanding of the vulnerability in their babies, especially in stressful situations”, were left out, even though this issue was raised by

Journal

International Journal of Developmental Scienceiospress

Published: Jan 1, 2016

References