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Book Review

Book Review Information Polity 21 (2016) 211–213 211 DOI 10.3233/IP-160384 IOS Press Social Media, Politics and the State. Protests, Revolutions, Riots, Crime and Policing in the Age of Facebook, Twitter and Youtube. 2015. Edited by Daniel Trottier and Christian Fuchs. London: Routledge. This edited volume aims to establish an agenda for ‘critical Internet and social media studies’, defined broadly as studies that ‘go beyond the digital version of the Laswell formula’ of politics (p. 3). More concretely, the introductory chapter by the two editors defines the core issue of the agenda as the study of social media in the context of neo-Marxist theories of state/politics, critical sociology and radical democracy. The introduction provides a good entry point to this ‘critical theory of social media’ agenda to which the two editors are already ardent contributors. The volume actually entails two introductions as the contribution by Donatella della Porta and Alice Mattoni is also listed as an introductory chapter. This chapter aims to ‘critically bridge social movement literature and media studies literature’ (p. 46) by identifying the particular ‘repertoire of communication’ at work in the ‘cycle’ of austerity protests reaching from Iceland in 2008 to Brazil in 2013. Other attributes defining this cycle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information Polity IOS Press

Book Review

Information Polity , Volume 21 (2): 3 – Jan 1, 2016

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved
ISSN
1570-1255
eISSN
1875-8754
DOI
10.3233/IP-160384
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Information Polity 21 (2016) 211–213 211 DOI 10.3233/IP-160384 IOS Press Social Media, Politics and the State. Protests, Revolutions, Riots, Crime and Policing in the Age of Facebook, Twitter and Youtube. 2015. Edited by Daniel Trottier and Christian Fuchs. London: Routledge. This edited volume aims to establish an agenda for ‘critical Internet and social media studies’, defined broadly as studies that ‘go beyond the digital version of the Laswell formula’ of politics (p. 3). More concretely, the introductory chapter by the two editors defines the core issue of the agenda as the study of social media in the context of neo-Marxist theories of state/politics, critical sociology and radical democracy. The introduction provides a good entry point to this ‘critical theory of social media’ agenda to which the two editors are already ardent contributors. The volume actually entails two introductions as the contribution by Donatella della Porta and Alice Mattoni is also listed as an introductory chapter. This chapter aims to ‘critically bridge social movement literature and media studies literature’ (p. 46) by identifying the particular ‘repertoire of communication’ at work in the ‘cycle’ of austerity protests reaching from Iceland in 2008 to Brazil in 2013. Other attributes defining this cycle

Journal

Information PolityIOS Press

Published: Jan 1, 2016

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