You Can Come Home Again: Narratives of Home and Belonging among Second-Generation Việt Kiều in Vietnam

You Can Come Home Again: Narratives of Home and Belonging among Second-Generation Việt Kiều... Abstract: Over the last decade, increasing numbers of second-generation overseas Vietnamese or Việt Kiều have returned to Vietnam to live and work. These are children of first-generation immigrant parents, who fled the country following the communist victory over South Vietnam in 1975. Since the 1990s, the government has implemented new laws and policies to encourage overseas Vietnamese to return to invest, work and live in Vietnam. However, recent state initiatives have also been hampered by substantial ambiguities and bureaucratic inefficiency. The narratives of second-generation Việt Kiều living in Hồ Chí Minh City reveal how — apart from state discourse and policies — personal motivations and pragmatic considerations also have an important bearing on their sense of “home” and “belonging” in Vietnam. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

You Can Come Home Again: Narratives of Home and Belonging among Second-Generation Việt Kiều in Vietnam

You Can Come Home Again: Narratives of Home and Belonging among Second-Generation Việt Kiều in Vietnam


SOJOURN: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia Vol. 30, No. 1 (2015), pp. 173–214 DOI: 10.1355/sj30-1f © 2015 ISEAS ISSN 0217-9520 print / ISSN 1793-2858 electronic You Can Come Home Again: Narratives of Home and Belonging among Second-Generation Việt Kiều in Vietnam Priscilla Koh Over the last decade, increasing numbers of second-generation overseas Vietnamese or Việt Kiều have returned to Vietnam to live and work. These are children of first-generation immigrant parents, who fled the country following the communist victory over South Vietnam in 1975. Since the 1990s, the government has implemented new laws and policies to encourage overseas Vietnamese to return to invest, work and live in Vietnam. However, recent state initiatives have also been hampered by substantial ambiguities and bureaucratic inefficiency. The narratives of second-generation Việt Kiều living in Hồ Chí Minh City reveal how — apart from state discourse and policies — personal motivations and pragmatic considerations also have an important bearing on their sense of “home” and “belonging” in Vietnam. Keywords: Việt Kiều, diaspora, second-generation, return migration, home, belonging, security. Over the last decade, increasing numbers of second-generation overseas Vietnamese, or Việt Kiều,1 have moved to Vietnam to live and work. This generation comprises those who were born overseas to first-generation immigrant parents from Vietnam, or who had left the country during their formative years.2 The majority of my informants left Vietnam as children at the end of the Second Indochina War, following the communist defeat of the Republic of Vietnam in 1975. Their decisions to return now should be understood in the context of a...
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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
ISSN
1793-2858
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Over the last decade, increasing numbers of second-generation overseas Vietnamese or Việt Kiều have returned to Vietnam to live and work. These are children of first-generation immigrant parents, who fled the country following the communist victory over South Vietnam in 1975. Since the 1990s, the government has implemented new laws and policies to encourage overseas Vietnamese to return to invest, work and live in Vietnam. However, recent state initiatives have also been hampered by substantial ambiguities and bureaucratic inefficiency. The narratives of second-generation Việt Kiều living in Hồ Chí Minh City reveal how — apart from state discourse and policies — personal motivations and pragmatic considerations also have an important bearing on their sense of “home” and “belonging” in Vietnam.

Journal

Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast AsiaInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Mar 27, 2015

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