Timor Leste: On a Path of Authoritarianism?

Timor Leste: On a Path of Authoritarianism? Southeast Asian Affairs 2006 TIMOR LESTE On a Path of Authoritarianism? Jacqueline Siapno Scholars, journalists, and political analysts observing East Timor for the past 20 to 30 years and visiting East Timor in 2005 comment that things seem to have become more "disheartening": the local people are more angry towards the malaes (foreigners), more disillusioned with the government, the political elite, and emerging Timorese capitalists; members of civil societies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are more worried about the narrowing of spaces for pluralistic visions, opposition, and dissent; ex-Falintil1 veterans are feeling more betrayed by the lack of acknowledgement of their contributions to the independence resistance struggle; armed forces soldiers have abandoned their barracks in Metinaro claiming discrimination and inequality; and citizens genuinely are concerned that the path to nation-building and democratization is increasingly signalling an authoritarian Mozambique-style suppression of opposition and freedom of speech. Politically, East Timor is a fascinating study of democratization processes in a conflict/post-conflict context, in addition to being a paradoxical case study of the United Nation's mixed performance and most extensive involvement in nation-state building and peacekeeping in Asia and the Pacific. The country is currently undergoing serious challenges to freedom of speech and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeast Asian Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

Timor Leste: On a Path of Authoritarianism?

Southeast Asian Affairs, Volume 2006 – Mar 30, 2006

Timor Leste: On a Path of Authoritarianism?


Southeast Asian Affairs 2006 TIMOR LESTE On a Path of Authoritarianism? Jacqueline Siapno Scholars, journalists, and political analysts observing East Timor for the past 20 to 30 years and visiting East Timor in 2005 comment that things seem to have become more "disheartening": the local people are more angry towards the malaes (foreigners), more disillusioned with the government, the political elite, and emerging Timorese capitalists; members of civil societies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are more worried about the narrowing of spaces for pluralistic visions, opposition, and dissent; ex-Falintil1 veterans are feeling more betrayed by the lack of acknowledgement of their contributions to the independence resistance struggle; armed forces soldiers have abandoned their barracks in Metinaro claiming discrimination and inequality; and citizens genuinely are concerned that the path to nation-building and democratization is increasingly signalling an authoritarian Mozambique-style suppression of opposition and freedom of speech. Politically, East Timor is a fascinating study of democratization processes in a conflict/post-conflict context, in addition to being a paradoxical case study of the United Nation's mixed performance and most extensive involvement in nation-state building and peacekeeping in Asia and the Pacific. The country is currently undergoing serious challenges to freedom of speech and judicial sector reform, with a centralistic and rather insecure state trying to control, censor, and regulate NGOs, civil society, media, and opposition parties. As an example, one of the most widely discussed issues between the government, the judicial sector, and civil society at the moment is the re-introduction of the defamation Jacqueline Siapno is a Joint-Lecturer in Political Science and the Asia Institute, University of Melbourne. She has been living and working in East Timor and Australia since July 1999 and has worked for political...
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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore
ISSN
1793-9135
Publisher site
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Abstract

Southeast Asian Affairs 2006 TIMOR LESTE On a Path of Authoritarianism? Jacqueline Siapno Scholars, journalists, and political analysts observing East Timor for the past 20 to 30 years and visiting East Timor in 2005 comment that things seem to have become more "disheartening": the local people are more angry towards the malaes (foreigners), more disillusioned with the government, the political elite, and emerging Timorese capitalists; members of civil societies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are more worried about the narrowing of spaces for pluralistic visions, opposition, and dissent; ex-Falintil1 veterans are feeling more betrayed by the lack of acknowledgement of their contributions to the independence resistance struggle; armed forces soldiers have abandoned their barracks in Metinaro claiming discrimination and inequality; and citizens genuinely are concerned that the path to nation-building and democratization is increasingly signalling an authoritarian Mozambique-style suppression of opposition and freedom of speech. Politically, East Timor is a fascinating study of democratization processes in a conflict/post-conflict context, in addition to being a paradoxical case study of the United Nation's mixed performance and most extensive involvement in nation-state building and peacekeeping in Asia and the Pacific. The country is currently undergoing serious challenges to freedom of speech and

Journal

Southeast Asian AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Mar 30, 2006

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