Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Trump Presidency and Indonesia: Challenges and Opportunities

The Trump Presidency and Indonesia: Challenges and Opportunities The Trump Presidency and Indonesia: Challenges and Opportunities Donald Trump’s electoral victory on 8 November 2016 came as something of a shock to the people of Indonesia. Once the news had sunk in, predictions on what Trump’s victory meant for Indonesia could be divided into three scenarios: Trump could carry out his campaign promises; he could abandon those promises; or he could adjust his alarming rhetoric and adopt a more reassuring tone. Within a couple of weeks of being inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States on 20 January 2017, the international community, including Indonesians discovered that the new US President not only continued to speak in an alarming manner, but also that he intended to make good on his campaign promise to “Make America Great Again”. Among the new president’s policies, two are likely to have a substantial impact on Indonesia and Southeast Asian countries: the first is America’s withdrawal from the multilateral trade agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP); and the second, restricting travel into the United States to citizens from seven Muslim majority countries in what has been described as a Muslim ban. The latter is Senior Lecturer in the International Relations Department, Faculty http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

The Trump Presidency and Indonesia: Challenges and Opportunities

The Trump Presidency and Indonesia: Challenges and Opportunities


The Trump Presidency and Indonesia: Challenges and Opportunities Donald Trump’s electoral victory on 8 November 2016 came as something of a shock to the people of Indonesia. Once the news had sunk in, predictions on what Trump’s victory meant for Indonesia could be divided into three scenarios: Trump could carry out his campaign promises; he could abandon those promises; or he could adjust his alarming rhetoric and adopt a more reassuring tone. Within a couple of weeks of being inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States on 20 January 2017, the international community, including Indonesians discovered that the new US President not only continued to speak in an alarming manner, but also that he intended to make good on his campaign promise to “Make America Great Again”. Among the new president’s policies, two are likely to have a substantial impact on Indonesia and Southeast Asian countries: the first is America’s withdrawal from the multilateral trade agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP); and the second, restricting travel into the United States to citizens from seven Muslim majority countries in what has been described as a Muslim ban. The latter is Senior Lecturer in the International Relations Department, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Universitas Indonesia. Postal address: MBRC FISIP UI, Building D, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI, Depok 16424, Indonesia; email: evi.fitriani09@ui.ac.id. 01 Roundtable-3P.indd 58 has created opposition in the United States and other countries. In Indonesia, the ban has been discussed vigorously in the mass and social media. In addition, there has been at least one demonstration in front of the US Embassy in Jakarta by Indonesian youths who protested Trump’s policy as it would affect around 14,000 refugees and asylum seekers...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/institute-of-southeast-asian-studies/the-trump-presidency-and-indonesia-challenges-and-opportunities-Ni6rc0J3DL
Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © The Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
ISSN
1793-284X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Trump Presidency and Indonesia: Challenges and Opportunities Donald Trump’s electoral victory on 8 November 2016 came as something of a shock to the people of Indonesia. Once the news had sunk in, predictions on what Trump’s victory meant for Indonesia could be divided into three scenarios: Trump could carry out his campaign promises; he could abandon those promises; or he could adjust his alarming rhetoric and adopt a more reassuring tone. Within a couple of weeks of being inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States on 20 January 2017, the international community, including Indonesians discovered that the new US President not only continued to speak in an alarming manner, but also that he intended to make good on his campaign promise to “Make America Great Again”. Among the new president’s policies, two are likely to have a substantial impact on Indonesia and Southeast Asian countries: the first is America’s withdrawal from the multilateral trade agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP); and the second, restricting travel into the United States to citizens from seven Muslim majority countries in what has been described as a Muslim ban. The latter is Senior Lecturer in the International Relations Department, Faculty

Journal

Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: May 5, 2017

There are no references for this article.