The Singapore of My Dreams

The Singapore of My Dreams Southeast Asian Affairs 2009 This essay is on the Singapore of my dreams. My dreams have obviously changed over the years. I will begin with my school boy's dreams. A School Boy's Dreams I grew up in colonial Singapore. After the Second World War, my parents sent me to a Chinese primary school. After a few years, because of my unsatisfactory progress, my parents decided to switch me to the English stream. I spent a bridging year in a Catholic school and then joined the Outram School, which was then a government primary school. I completed my secondary education at Raffles Institution (RI). What were my school boy's dreams for Singapore? First, I dreamt that one day Singapore would be independent and we would be able to rule ourselves. I was greatly influenced by the anti-colonial struggles and nationalist movements then taking place in Asia and Africa. I remember debating the merits and demerits of colonialism with one of my expatriate teachers in RI. Second, I dreamt that one day Singapore would be without slums and all Singaporeans would have access to good housing, clean water and modern sanitation. I had relatives living in Bukit Ho Swee1 and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeast Asian Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

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Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
ISSN
1793-9135
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Abstract

Southeast Asian Affairs 2009 This essay is on the Singapore of my dreams. My dreams have obviously changed over the years. I will begin with my school boy's dreams. A School Boy's Dreams I grew up in colonial Singapore. After the Second World War, my parents sent me to a Chinese primary school. After a few years, because of my unsatisfactory progress, my parents decided to switch me to the English stream. I spent a bridging year in a Catholic school and then joined the Outram School, which was then a government primary school. I completed my secondary education at Raffles Institution (RI). What were my school boy's dreams for Singapore? First, I dreamt that one day Singapore would be independent and we would be able to rule ourselves. I was greatly influenced by the anti-colonial struggles and nationalist movements then taking place in Asia and Africa. I remember debating the merits and demerits of colonialism with one of my expatriate teachers in RI. Second, I dreamt that one day Singapore would be without slums and all Singaporeans would have access to good housing, clean water and modern sanitation. I had relatives living in Bukit Ho Swee1 and

Journal

Southeast Asian AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Jan 23, 2010

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