The Domestic Politics of Indonesia’s Approach to the Tribunal Ruling and the South China Sea

The Domestic Politics of Indonesia’s Approach to the Tribunal Ruling and the South China Sea The Domestic Politics of Indonesia’s Approach to the Tribunal Ruling and the South China Sea Indonesia’s immediate response to the 12 July ruling by the Arbitral Tribunal was under-whelming. The foreign ministry issued a bland, lacklustre five-sentence statement: • Indonesia calls on all parties to exercise restraint and refrain from escalatory activities while securing Southeast Asia from military activities that could threaten peace and stability, and instead should respect international law, including 1982 UNCLOS. • Indonesia calls on all parties to continue the common commitment to uphold peace and exhibit friendship and cooperation, as have been well-sustained thus far. • Indonesia urges all parties in the South China Sea to behave and conduct their activities according to agreed-upon principles. • Indonesia will continue to push for a peaceful, free, and neutral zone in Southeast Asia to further strengthen the ASEAN political and security community. is a researcher at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Jakarta and a doctoral candidate at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, where he was a Fulbright Presidential Scholar (2011–15). Postal address: Pakarti Centre Building, 5th Floor, Jl. Tanah Abang 3 No. 23-27, Jakarta, Indonesia 10160; email: evan.laksmana@csis.or.id. 01 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

The Domestic Politics of Indonesia’s Approach to the Tribunal Ruling and the South China Sea

The Domestic Politics of Indonesia’s Approach to the Tribunal Ruling and the South China Sea


The Domestic Politics of Indonesia’s Approach to the Tribunal Ruling and the South China Sea Indonesia’s immediate response to the 12 July ruling by the Arbitral Tribunal was under-whelming. The foreign ministry issued a bland, lacklustre five-sentence statement: • Indonesia calls on all parties to exercise restraint and refrain from escalatory activities while securing Southeast Asia from military activities that could threaten peace and stability, and instead should respect international law, including 1982 UNCLOS. • Indonesia calls on all parties to continue the common commitment to uphold peace and exhibit friendship and cooperation, as have been well-sustained thus far. • Indonesia urges all parties in the South China Sea to behave and conduct their activities according to agreed-upon principles. • Indonesia will continue to push for a peaceful, free, and neutral zone in Southeast Asia to further strengthen the ASEAN political and security community. is a researcher at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Jakarta and a doctoral candidate at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, where he was a Fulbright Presidential Scholar (2011–15). Postal address: Pakarti Centre Building, 5th Floor, Jl. Tanah Abang 3 No. 23-27, Jakarta, Indonesia 10160; email: evan.laksmana@csis.or.id. 01 Roundtable-3P.indd 382 • Indonesia urges all claimant states to continue peaceful negotiations over the overlapping sovereignty claims in the South China Sea according to international law.1 At first glance, there is nothing fundamentally disagreeable about the statement. After all, Indonesia remains technically a non-claimant in the South China Sea dispute. Upon closer examination, however, the statement appears to be yet another example of Indonesia’s inconsistent approach to the South China Sea, as well as to...
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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © The Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
ISSN
1793-284X
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Domestic Politics of Indonesia’s Approach to the Tribunal Ruling and the South China Sea Indonesia’s immediate response to the 12 July ruling by the Arbitral Tribunal was under-whelming. The foreign ministry issued a bland, lacklustre five-sentence statement: • Indonesia calls on all parties to exercise restraint and refrain from escalatory activities while securing Southeast Asia from military activities that could threaten peace and stability, and instead should respect international law, including 1982 UNCLOS. • Indonesia calls on all parties to continue the common commitment to uphold peace and exhibit friendship and cooperation, as have been well-sustained thus far. • Indonesia urges all parties in the South China Sea to behave and conduct their activities according to agreed-upon principles. • Indonesia will continue to push for a peaceful, free, and neutral zone in Southeast Asia to further strengthen the ASEAN political and security community. is a researcher at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Jakarta and a doctoral candidate at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, where he was a Fulbright Presidential Scholar (2011–15). Postal address: Pakarti Centre Building, 5th Floor, Jl. Tanah Abang 3 No. 23-27, Jakarta, Indonesia 10160; email: evan.laksmana@csis.or.id. 01

Journal

Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Feb 4, 2016

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