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Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security by Denny Roy (review)

Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security by Denny Roy (review) Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 35, No. 3 (2013), pp. 453–55 DOI: 10.1355/cs35-3h © 2013 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security. By Denny Roy. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013. Hardcover: 279pp. Denny Roy’s comprehensive survey examines the impact of China’s growing military and economic power through the lens of a “hegemonic transition” that Roy perceives to be underway in East Asia. This will not necessarily lead to war between the United States and China, but the cost of avoiding it would be “the abdication of America’s position as a great power in Asia” to permit “a hegemonic transition without a hegemonic war” (pp. 57, 140). Even if the two powers find a modus vivendi, China’s growing strength will increase domestic pressure on Beijing to act more assertively abroad (pp. 35, 258), and other nations will have to adjust to the reality of Chinese dominance. In any case, the book concludes, “China’s continued growth into a Great Power or a regional hegemon will likely lead to a net reduction in security for most of the world” (p. 262). Roy begins his analysis with distinctive elements of China’s worldview. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security by Denny Roy (review)

Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security by Denny Roy (review)


Abstract

Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 35, No. 3 (2013), pp. 453–55 DOI: 10.1355/cs35-3h © 2013 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security. By Denny Roy. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013. Hardcover: 279pp. Denny Roy’s comprehensive survey examines the impact of China’s growing military and economic power through the lens of a “hegemonic transition” that Roy perceives to be underway in East Asia. This will not necessarily lead to war between the United States and China, but the cost of avoiding it would be “the abdication of America’s position as a great power in Asia” to permit “a hegemonic transition without a hegemonic war” (pp. 57, 140). Even if the two powers find a modus vivendi, China’s growing strength will increase domestic pressure on Beijing to act more assertively abroad (pp. 35, 258), and other nations will have to adjust to the reality of Chinese dominance. In any case, the book concludes, “China’s continued growth into a Great Power or a regional hegemon will likely lead to a net reduction in security for most of the world” (p. 262). Roy begins his analysis with distinctive elements of China’s worldview.

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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
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Copyright © The Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
ISSN
1793-284X
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Abstract

Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 35, No. 3 (2013), pp. 453–55 DOI: 10.1355/cs35-3h © 2013 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Return of the Dragon: Rising China and Regional Security. By Denny Roy. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013. Hardcover: 279pp. Denny Roy’s comprehensive survey examines the impact of China’s growing military and economic power through the lens of a “hegemonic transition” that Roy perceives to be underway in East Asia. This will not necessarily lead to war between the United States and China, but the cost of avoiding it would be “the abdication of America’s position as a great power in Asia” to permit “a hegemonic transition without a hegemonic war” (pp. 57, 140). Even if the two powers find a modus vivendi, China’s growing strength will increase domestic pressure on Beijing to act more assertively abroad (pp. 35, 258), and other nations will have to adjust to the reality of Chinese dominance. In any case, the book concludes, “China’s continued growth into a Great Power or a regional hegemon will likely lead to a net reduction in security for most of the world” (p. 262). Roy begins his analysis with distinctive elements of China’s worldview.

Journal

Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Dec 13, 2013

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