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Nationalism and Power Politics in Japan’s Relations with China: A Neoclassical Realist Interpretation by Lai Yew Meng (review)

Nationalism and Power Politics in Japan’s Relations with China: A Neoclassical Realist... Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 35, No. 3 (2013), pp. 459–61 DOI: 10.1355/cs35-3j © 2013 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Nationalism and Power Politics in Japan’s Relations with China: A Neoclassical Realist Interpretation. By Lai Yew Meng. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2014. Hardcover: 243pp. The relationship between East Asia’s two Great Powers — China and Japan — is mired in dangerous nationalism. This book joins a growing literature that explores how nationalism, identity politics and “history problems” are shaping the politics and security of East Asia. In this volume, Lai Yew Meng seeks to understand whether nationalism is the main driver of Japan’s China policy, and the precise conditions under which nationalism matters in shaping that policy. To do so, the book focuses on two significant issues in the China-Japan relationship: the Yasukuni Shrine and the Senkaku/ Diaoyu Islands territorial dispute. Although Lai’s empirical research is drawn from the period of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi’s administration (2001–06), both issues continue to plague the ChinaJapan relationship and his research will therefore be of interest to many readers. The book uses a Neoclassical Realist framework that treats nationalism as an intervening variable that mediates between external, systemic pressures and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

Nationalism and Power Politics in Japan’s Relations with China: A Neoclassical Realist Interpretation by Lai Yew Meng (review)

Nationalism and Power Politics in Japan’s Relations with China: A Neoclassical Realist Interpretation by Lai Yew Meng (review)


Abstract

Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 35, No. 3 (2013), pp. 459–61 DOI: 10.1355/cs35-3j © 2013 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Nationalism and Power Politics in Japan’s Relations with China: A Neoclassical Realist Interpretation. By Lai Yew Meng. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2014. Hardcover: 243pp. The relationship between East Asia’s two Great Powers — China and Japan — is mired in dangerous nationalism. This book joins a growing literature that explores how nationalism, identity politics and “history problems” are shaping the politics and security of East Asia. In this volume, Lai Yew Meng seeks to understand whether nationalism is the main driver of Japan’s China policy, and the precise conditions under which nationalism matters in shaping that policy. To do so, the book focuses on two significant issues in the China-Japan relationship: the Yasukuni Shrine and the Senkaku/ Diaoyu Islands territorial dispute. Although Lai’s empirical research is drawn from the period of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi’s administration (2001–06), both issues continue to plague the ChinaJapan relationship and his research will therefore be of interest to many readers. The book uses a Neoclassical Realist framework that treats nationalism as an intervening variable that mediates between external, systemic pressures and

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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © The Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
ISSN
1793-284X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 35, No. 3 (2013), pp. 459–61 DOI: 10.1355/cs35-3j © 2013 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Nationalism and Power Politics in Japan’s Relations with China: A Neoclassical Realist Interpretation. By Lai Yew Meng. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2014. Hardcover: 243pp. The relationship between East Asia’s two Great Powers — China and Japan — is mired in dangerous nationalism. This book joins a growing literature that explores how nationalism, identity politics and “history problems” are shaping the politics and security of East Asia. In this volume, Lai Yew Meng seeks to understand whether nationalism is the main driver of Japan’s China policy, and the precise conditions under which nationalism matters in shaping that policy. To do so, the book focuses on two significant issues in the China-Japan relationship: the Yasukuni Shrine and the Senkaku/ Diaoyu Islands territorial dispute. Although Lai’s empirical research is drawn from the period of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi’s administration (2001–06), both issues continue to plague the ChinaJapan relationship and his research will therefore be of interest to many readers. The book uses a Neoclassical Realist framework that treats nationalism as an intervening variable that mediates between external, systemic pressures and

Journal

Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Dec 13, 2013

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