Indonesian Foreign Policy: A Wounded Phoenix

Indonesian Foreign Policy: A Wounded Phoenix Southeast Asian Affairs 2005 INDONESIAN FOREIGN POLICY A Wounded Phoenix Donald E Weatherbee Introduction: Heightened Expectations On 16th August 2004, Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri gave the annual presidential state address to Indonesia's Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat, its House of Representatives. As it was, this turned out to be her final appearance in that role since five weeks later she was decisively defeated in the run-off presidential election by Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. In her speech documenting the achievements of her stewardship of the republic, little reference was made to foreign policy. This was understandable given the critical political and economic domestic crises facing the Indonesian leadership. The event that was singled out in her brief allusion to foreign affairs was telling, however, signalling as it did the assertion of a re-emergent regional leadership role for Indonesia. The touchstone for the claim was the 9th ASEAN Summit held in Bali in October 2003, where she said, In ASEAN, which constitutes a priority in the conduct of our foreign policy, Indonesia was once again able to show its leadership. The success of Indonesia, during the 9th Summit, in preparing the Bali Concord II has strengthened the role, commitment, and the leadership of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Southeast Asian Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

Indonesian Foreign Policy: A Wounded Phoenix

Southeast Asian Affairs, Volume 2005 – Mar 30, 2005

Indonesian Foreign Policy: A Wounded Phoenix


Southeast Asian Affairs 2005 INDONESIAN FOREIGN POLICY A Wounded Phoenix Donald E Weatherbee Introduction: Heightened Expectations On 16th August 2004, Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri gave the annual presidential state address to Indonesia's Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat, its House of Representatives. As it was, this turned out to be her final appearance in that role since five weeks later she was decisively defeated in the run-off presidential election by Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. In her speech documenting the achievements of her stewardship of the republic, little reference was made to foreign policy. This was understandable given the critical political and economic domestic crises facing the Indonesian leadership. The event that was singled out in her brief allusion to foreign affairs was telling, however, signalling as it did the assertion of a re-emergent regional leadership role for Indonesia. The touchstone for the claim was the 9th ASEAN Summit held in Bali in October 2003, where she said, In ASEAN, which constitutes a priority in the conduct of our foreign policy, Indonesia was once again able to show its leadership. The success of Indonesia, during the 9th Summit, in preparing the Bali Concord II has strengthened the role, commitment, and the leadership of Indonesia within ASEAN.1 This was not just posturing by Megawati. More neutral Indonesia-watchers picked up the theme. Anthony Smith wrote: "The Bali Summit witnessed Indonesia's re-emergence to the role of group leader, or at least demonstrated Jakarta's desire to begin to steer the direction of the grouping again."2 Megawati's celebration of Indonesia's important role in formulating the heralded Bali Concord II (ASEAN Concord II) evoked memories of the 1976 Bali Summit Donald E. Weatherbee is the Donald S. Russell Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA. Indonesian Foreign Policy: A Wounded Phoenix151 hosted by...
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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore
ISSN
1793-9135
Publisher site
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Abstract

Southeast Asian Affairs 2005 INDONESIAN FOREIGN POLICY A Wounded Phoenix Donald E Weatherbee Introduction: Heightened Expectations On 16th August 2004, Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri gave the annual presidential state address to Indonesia's Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat, its House of Representatives. As it was, this turned out to be her final appearance in that role since five weeks later she was decisively defeated in the run-off presidential election by Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. In her speech documenting the achievements of her stewardship of the republic, little reference was made to foreign policy. This was understandable given the critical political and economic domestic crises facing the Indonesian leadership. The event that was singled out in her brief allusion to foreign affairs was telling, however, signalling as it did the assertion of a re-emergent regional leadership role for Indonesia. The touchstone for the claim was the 9th ASEAN Summit held in Bali in October 2003, where she said, In ASEAN, which constitutes a priority in the conduct of our foreign policy, Indonesia was once again able to show its leadership. The success of Indonesia, during the 9th Summit, in preparing the Bali Concord II has strengthened the role, commitment, and the leadership of

Journal

Southeast Asian AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Mar 30, 2005

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