China’s Engagement with Regional Security Multilateralism: The Case of the Shangri-La Dialogue

China’s Engagement with Regional Security Multilateralism: The Case of the Shangri-La Dialogue Abstract: Using a case study of Beijing’s participation in the Shangri-La Dialogue, a prominent annual security gathering in Singapore, this article analyses China’s approach to Asian security multilateralism. It does so by developing and employing a typology consisting of four characterizations of multilateral engagement: China as “blocker”; China as “socialized participant”; China as “shaper”; and China as “opportunistic participant”. The article shows that in its approach to the Shangri-La Dialogue, China displays all four of these traits, while noting that some are more prevalent and compelling at certain points in time. It uses this finding to draw conclusions about Beijing’s future engagement with the Shangri-La Dialogue and its broader approach to security multilateralism. It also contributes to the larger debate over whether China is a “revisionist” or a “status quo” rising power. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

China’s Engagement with Regional Security Multilateralism: The Case of the Shangri-La Dialogue

China’s Engagement with Regional Security Multilateralism: The Case of the Shangri-La Dialogue


Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 37, No. 1 (2015), pp. 29–48 DOI: 10.1355/cs37-1b © 2015 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic China’s Engagement with Regional Security Multilateralism: The Case of the Shangri-La Dialogue NICK BISLEY and BRENDAN TAYLOR Using a case study of Beijing’s participation in the Shangri-La Dialogue, a prominent annual security gathering in Singapore, this article analyses China’s approach to Asian security multilateralism. It does so by developing and employing a typology consisting of four characterizations of multilateral engagement: China as “blocker”; China as “socialized participant”; China as “shaper”; and China as “opportunistic participant”. The article shows that in its approach to the Shangri-La Dialogue, China displays all four of these traits, while noting that some are more prevalent and compelling at certain points in time. It uses this finding to draw conclusions about Beijing’s future engagement with the Shangri-La Dialogue and its broader approach to security multilateralism. It also contributes to the larger debate over whether China is a “revisionist” or a “status quo” rising power. Keywords: China, security multilateralism, regional architecture, defence diplomacy, Shangri-La Dialogue. Nick Bisley is Executive Director of La Trobe Asia at La Trobe University. Postal address: La Trobe University, Bundoora VIC 3086, Australia; email: N.Bisley@latrobe.edu.au. Brendan Taylor is Head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. Postal address: Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Hedley Bull Building 130, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia; email: brendan.taylor@anu.edu.au. 02 Nick.indd 29 30/3/15 1:33 pm Nick Bisley and Brendan Taylor Making sense of the implications of China’s rise...
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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © The Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
ISSN
1793-284X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Using a case study of Beijing’s participation in the Shangri-La Dialogue, a prominent annual security gathering in Singapore, this article analyses China’s approach to Asian security multilateralism. It does so by developing and employing a typology consisting of four characterizations of multilateral engagement: China as “blocker”; China as “socialized participant”; China as “shaper”; and China as “opportunistic participant”. The article shows that in its approach to the Shangri-La Dialogue, China displays all four of these traits, while noting that some are more prevalent and compelling at certain points in time. It uses this finding to draw conclusions about Beijing’s future engagement with the Shangri-La Dialogue and its broader approach to security multilateralism. It also contributes to the larger debate over whether China is a “revisionist” or a “status quo” rising power.

Journal

Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: May 6, 2015

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